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A strong majority also say that if they could, they would vote for a measure requiring background checks on all gun purchases by an 83 to 17 split.

The poll’s findings, showing strong support for background checks, comes as Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinWhere do we go from here? Conservation can show the way Lawmakers push back at Trump's Pentagon funding grab for wall Overnight Health Care: Appeals court strikes down Medicaid work requirements | Pelosi's staff huddles with aides on surprise billing | Senate Dems pressure Trump to drop ObamaCare lawsuit MORE (D-W.Va.), who co-authored the bill with Sen. Patrick ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyNSA improperly collected US phone records in October, new documents show Overnight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns MORE (R-Pa.), said he “absolutely” plans to bring the legislation back to the Senate floor and believes it could pass.

"I truly do," Manchin said on "Fox News Sunday." "The only thing we've asked for is that people read the bill."

The Manchin and Toomey measure expanded background checks to all gun show and Internet sales, but failed to reach the 60 votes needed in the Senate in the face of strong opposition from the gun lobby.

The defeat was a setback for gun control proponents and President Obama, who had made expanded background checks a centerpiece of his efforts to cut gun violence. 

The gun lobby said the bill would criminalize the transfer of firearms between family members and warned it could lead to the creation of a federal database of gun owners, claims Manchin and Toomey denied.

Forty percent of those polled by Gallup who opposed the Senate background check measure, cited the Second Amendment as the reason for their stance. Twenty-three percent of opponents said authorities needed to enforce the gun laws already on the books. Twenty percent said criminals would always be able to purchase guns, with 19 percent saying gun control laws did not work.

Republicans were least supportive of the background check bill with 45 percent saying the Senate should have passed the measure to 50 percent opposing it. But Democrats (85-12) and independents (64-30) backed the background check bill.

The Gallup poll was conducted from April 22-25 and has a 4 point margin of error.