Cook: Clinton passes 1M in popular vote lead
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWe need to be 'One America,' the polling says — and the politicians should listen Poll shows Biden with 6-point edge on Trump in Florida Does Joe Biden really want to be president? MORE has surpassed 1 million in her popular vote margin over President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpOvernight Health Care: US hits 10,000 coronavirus deaths | Trump touts 'friendly' talk with Biden on response | Trump dismisses report on hospital shortages as 'just wrong' | Cuomo sees possible signs of curve flattening in NY We need to be 'One America,' the polling says — and the politicians should listen Barr tells prosecutors to consider coronavirus risk when determining bail: report MORE, according to a Tuesday tally from the nonpartisan Cook Political Report. 

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Clinton leads Trump in the popular vote, 61,694,263 to 60,961,967, Cook officials said, with 20,000 votes from Montgomery County, Md., pushing her over the 1 million mark. 

Trump won the White House via the Electoral College a week ago, while the former secretary of State is now the fifth nominee in American history to win the popular vote but lose the presidency. 

The most recent example came in 2000, when Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreAl Gore blasts Trump: 'You can't gaslight a virus' Who should be the Democratic vice presidential candidate? The Hill's Morning Report - Trump takes unexpected step to stem coronavirus MORE won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College to President George W. Bush via a razor-thin margin in Florida. 

Online petitions with millions of signatures have called on electors to vote for Clinton when they vote in December, citing her lead in the popular vote. 

Those are highly unlikely to go anywhere, as electors would be unwilling to ignore precedent or vote against their state's pick.

Still, Democrats, including 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie SandersBernie SandersWisconsin Supreme Court blocks governor's effort to delay election The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden, Trump discuss coronavirus response; Wisconsin postpones elections Wisconsin governor postpones Tuesday's election over coronavirus MORE, have called for a reexamination of the Electoral College. 

Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerPolls show big bounce to Biden ahead of Super Tuesday Sanders poised for big Super Tuesday Establishment Democrats rallying behind Biden MORE (D-Calif.) introduced legislation on Tuesday to get rid of the institution. 

"In my lifetime, I have seen two elections where the winner of the general election did not win the popular vote," Boxer said in a statement.

"The Electoral College is an outdated, undemocratic system that does not reflect our modern society, and it needs to change immediately."

Boxer's legislation is unlikely to pass, however. 

Even if it is approved by Congress, it would need to be approved by three-fourths of the states within seven years before it would take effect. 

The president-elect has flipped on his feelings regarding the Electoral College, calling it "genius" on Tuesday after labeling it a "disaster for democracy" in 2012. Trump said if the election were based on popular vote, he would have campaigned differently and beaten Clinton that way, too.