Clinton beats Trump by nearly 3M in popular vote
© Getty Images

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSamantha Power's Herculean task: Turning a screw with a rubber screwdriver Beau Biden Foundation to deny lobbyist donations, make major donors public Whoopi Goldberg wears 'my vice president' shirt day after inauguration MORE won the popular vote by just under 3 million votes, final state vote totals aggregated by the Cook Report revealed on Tuesday.

The political news outlet, which has been tracking the votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, found Clinton with 65.8 million votes and 48.2 percent, compared to 62.9 million and 46.6 percent for Republican Donald TrumpDonald TrumpIran's leader vows 'revenge,' posting an image resembling Trump Former Sanders spokesperson: Biden 'backing away' from 'populist offerings' Justice Dept. to probe sudden departure of US attorney in Atlanta after Trump criticism MORE.

It tweeted out that all of the states plus D.C. had certified their results. 

Other candidates — including Green Party Candidate Jill Stein, Libertarian Candidate Gary JohnsonGary Earl JohnsonOn The Trail: Making sense of Super Poll Sunday Polarized campaign leaves little room for third-party hopefuls The Memo: Trump retains narrow path to victory MORE and write-ins — took 5.7 percent of the popular vote, Cook Report’s data showed.

ADVERTISEMENT

The results come a day after the Electoral College voted to secure Trump's presidency.

On Monday, Trump won 304 Electoral College votes — just two below those he won on election night. Two Republican electors cast their ballots for alternatives.

Clinton got 227 votes after five Democratic electors voted for alternatives.  

Anti-Trump groups had urged Republican electors to defect but those efforts fell flat. Clinton received more defections than Trump in the final tally.

Many Democrats across the country have called for an end to the Electoral College since the election.

On Monday, The New York Times’s editorial board pushed for ending the Electoral College, calling it an “antiquated mechanism” that eliminates “basic fairness” from the presidential race.

Clinton is the second Democrat to lose the presidential election but win the popular vote in the last five races. Republican George W. Bush defeated Democrat Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreAl Gore: 'If I were still in the Senate, I would vote to convict' Trump Four points for Biden to make in his inaugural address Fox News's DC managing editor Bill Sammon to retire MORE in the 2000 election after Gore won the popular vote by more than 500,000 votes -- a sizably smaller lead than Clinton.

This story was updated at 3:04 p.m.