Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell says he made 'inadvertent omission' in voting remarks amid backlash These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 WATCH: The Hill recaps the top stories of the week MORE said Wednesday that Republicans will not accept any Democratic efforts to block a Supreme Court nominee chosen by President-elect Trump.

“Apparently there’s yet a new standard now to not confirm a Supreme Court nominee at all,” McConnell said. "I think that’s something the American people simply will not tolerate and we’ll be looking forward to receiving a Supreme Court nomination and moving forward on it.”

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McConnell's remarks come after nearly 10 months of Senate Republican opposition to the Supreme Court nomination of Merrick Garland, the federal appeals court judge nominated by President Obama in March 2016. Senate Republicans have refused to hold a hearing or vote on Garland's nomination, arguing that the opening should be filled by the next president. 

Speaking on Capitol Hill Wednesday alongside Vice President-elect Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceMan who threatened to kill Ocasio-Cortez, Pelosi pleads guilty to federal charges Giuliani led fake electors plot: CNN The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems look to repackage BBB into salvageable bill MORE, McConnell responded to Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerForced deadline spurs drastic tactic in Congress Democrats call on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans Predictions of disaster for Democrats aren't guarantees of midterm failure MORE’s statement that Democrats would not accept on a Supreme Court nominee they wouldn’t approve of.

“We’re not going to settle on a Supreme Court nominee,” Schumer told MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow on Tuesday. “If they don’t appoint someone who’s really good, we’re gonna oppose him tooth and nail.”

In his MSNBC appearance, Schumer said he doubted Trump would ever choose a candidate Democrats would support.

"It's hard for me to imagine a nominee that Donald TrumpDonald TrumpBiden says Roe v. Wade under attack like 'never before' On student loans, Biden doesn't have an answer yet Grill company apologizes after sending meatloaf recipe on same day of rock star's death MORE chooses that would get Republican support that we could support," Schumer said.

In his remarks Wednesday, McConnell accused Schumer of instituting an "expansion of the Biden rule"—a reference to a 1992 speech given by then-Senator Joe BidenJoe BidenSunday shows preview: US reaffirms support for Ukraine amid threat of Russian invasion The Fed has a clear mandate to mitigate climate risks Biden says Roe v. Wade under attack like 'never before' MORE arguing that any Supreme Court opening should be filled after that year's presidential election. Republicans have used Biden's 1992 speech to justify their block on Garland's nomination.