Hillary Clinton to deliver commencement speech at alma mater
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSanders thanks Iowa voters for giving momentum to progressive agenda Manchin wrestles with progressive backlash in West Virginia Arizona newspaper backs Democrat in dead heat Senate race MORE will return to Wellesley College in the spring to speak at her alma mater's commencement ceremony, the school and its newspaper announced Wednesday. 

This won’t be the first commencement speech at the school for Clinton, who made history as the first female presidential candidate of a major party.

At her own commencement ceremonies in June 1969, Clinton — then Hillary Rodham — addressed her fellow graduates as the school’s first-ever student speaker.

“Every protest, every dissent, whether it's an individual academic paper or Founder's parking lot demonstration, is unabashedly an attempt to forge an identity in this particular age,” Clinton said in her speech. “That attempt at forging for many of us over the past four years has meant coming to terms with our humanness.”

Clinton attracted national attention when she broke from the script of her speech to respond to then-Republican Sen. Edward Brooke’s comments, just before her own.

"This has to be very quick because I do have a little speech to give. Part of the problem with just empathy with professed goals is that empathy doesn't do us anything,” Clinton said. “We've had lots of empathy; we've had lots of sympathy, but we feel that for too long our leaders have viewed politics as the art of the possible. And the challenge now is to practice politics as the art of making what appears to be impossible possible."

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At the time, Clinton was the student government president at Wellesley College, a private women-only college in Wellesley, Mass. Its next commencement ceremony will take place May 26, 2017.

Clinton also delivered the school’s commencement address in 1992, when she was first lady.

The school’s president and class president praised Clinton in a statement as someone who has "changed the face of American politics."

“[Clinton] joins a long line of women history-makers, including fellow Wellesley alumnae, who give us all a profound sense of hope that the future is ours to define,” Wellesley College President Paula Johnson said. “A true force of nature, Clinton inspires women of all ages to find their voice, to defy expectations, to reject stereotypes—to match their competence with confidence in pursuing tangible, positive change in the world.”

Clinton has largely remained out of the public eye since her stunning defeat in last November's presidential election. She's been spotted by supporters in the Chappaqua woods in New York and traveled back to Washington, D.C. to honor former Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidFive takeaways from testy Heller-Rosen debate in Nevada Major overhauls needed to ensure a violent revolution remains fictional Senate heads home to campaign after deal on Trump nominees MORE (D-Nev.) before his retirement. Most notably, she attended President Trump’s inauguration ceremony in Jan. 20 with her husband, for President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonConservatives bankrolled and dominated Kavanaugh confirmation media campaign Sen. Walter Huddleston was a reminder that immigration used to be a bipartisan issue No, civility isn't optional MORE.