A congressional watchdog has named 17 lawmakers to its "most corrupt" members of Congress list. 

The seventh annual report by Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) lists 13 members — 9 Republicans and 4 Democrats — as having allegedly violated congressional ethics rules or criminal laws, such as illegally using campaign contributions or failing to disclose accurate financial records.

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The House Ethics Committee is conducting probes of several members listed in the report, including Democratic Reps. Rob Andrews (N.J.), Tim BishopTimothy (Tim) Howard BishopDem candidate 'struck by the parallels' between Trump's rise and Hitler's Dems separated by 29 votes in NY House primary Flint residents hire first K Street firm MORE (N.Y.) and Republican Reps. Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannYes, condemn Roseanne, but ignoring others is true hypocrisy Bachmann won't run for Franken's Senate seat because she did not hear a 'call from God' Billboard from ‘God’ tells Michele Bachmann not to run for Senate MORE (Minn.) and Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungAlaska lawmakers must get serious about Jones Act repeal How the Trump tax law passed: GOP adds sweeteners Election handicapper moves 10 races toward Dems MORE (Alaska).

Based off media articles, public financial and travel records and court documents, the report also gives “dishonorable mentions” to 4 lawmakers: Reps. Bill Owens (D-N.Y.), Peter Roskam (R-Ill.), Aaron Schock (R-Ill.), and John Tierney (D-Mass.). — for allegedly using their offices for personal gain.

The Ethics panel recently declined to continue its investigation of Tierney, saying that they found no evidence that he intentionally violated House rules by not disclosing on his financial disclosure reports money that was given to him and his wife by family members.

Other House members listed in the report include: Reps. Gregory Meeks (D-N.Y.), Paul BrounPaul Collins BrounCalifornia lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment Republican candidates run against ghost of John Boehner The Trail 2016: Let’s have another debate! MORE (R-Ga.), Vern Buchanan (R-Fla.), Scott Desjarlais (R-Tenn.), Michael Grimm (R-N.Y.), Hal Rogers (R-Ky.), and David Valadao (R-Calif.).

CREW also names Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocrats slide in battle for Senate McConnell and wife confronted by customers at restaurant Pelosi, Schumer: Trump 'desperate' to put focus on immigration, not health care MORE and Senate Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezTrump lowers refugee goal to 30,000, he must meet it Blame Senate, not FBI, for Kavanaugh travesty Dems urge tech companies to remove 3D-gun blueprints MORE (D-N.J.).

McConnell was caught in a compromising position earlier this year when a secretly recorded conversation was leaked to the media. Campaign staff for McConnell had been conducting opposition research on two of his political opponents and credited several of the leader’s congressional staff with helping.

“If Sen. McConnell used Senate staff or resources to conduct opposition research against potential campaign opponents, he may have engaged in conduct reflecting unfavorably upon the Senate,” states CREW’s report.

McConnell’s office has rebutted the charges that his aides violated federal law and Senate rules, stating that any assistance to the campaign by congressional staffers happened on their own time, as allowed under law and the chamber’s rules.

The allegations against Menendez center around his relationship with his friend and campaign donor, Salomon Melgen. Menendez accepted and failed to initially report at least two flights from Melgen, a wealthy Florida doctor. Menendez eventually reimbursed Melgen for the cost of the flights — nearly $60,000 — earlier this year after an ethics complaint had been filed by a political rival.

CREW also makes mention of a New York Times article which drew attention to the fact that Menendez helped advocate for the enforcement of a government contract with a company that Melgen had a stake in.

Additionally, The Washington Post raised questions with an article earlier this year that detailed Menendez’s attempt to intervene with government healthcare agencies over nearly $9 million in repayments on Melgen’s behalf.

Menendez has denied any wrongdoing and news of the scandal has fallen silent as federal authorities and the Senate Ethics Committee continue to probe the matter.