Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainColbert mocks Gaetz after Trump denies he asked for a pardon Five reasons why US faces chronic crisis at border Meghan McCain calls on Gaetz to resign MORE (R-Ariz.) said Friday the GOP has become a "dysfunctional" party that has spent more time infighting over ObamaCare than targeting Democrats who passed the law. 

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McCain blamed Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzHarry Reid reacts to Boehner book excerpt: 'We didn't mince words' GOP lawmakers block Biden assistance to Palestinians Cruz on Boehner: 'I wear with pride his drunken, bloviated scorn' MORE (R-Texas) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOn management of Utah public lands, Biden should pursue an accountable legislative process Rubio asks MLB commissioner if he'll give up Augusta golf club membership Why some Republicans think vaccine passports will backfire on Democrats MORE (R-Utah.), the leaders of the movement to tie defunding of ObamaCare to the threat of a government shutdown, for driving wedges between Republicans. Both have appeared in ads attacking fellow GOP lawmakers. 

“We are dividing the Republican Party," McCain said on CBS. In his nearly 30 years in the Senate, McCain said he has never seen the infighting among members of his party so bad. 

“Rather than attacking Democrats and maybe trying to persuade those five or six Democrats that are leaning Republican, we are now launching attacks against Republicans funded by commercials that Sen. Lee and Sen. Cruz appear in.” 

McCain called the party dysfunctional ahead of a Senate vote to advance the House passed funding bill. Democrats are expected to strip the defunding of ObamaCare out of the bill Friday before sending it back to the lower chamber. 

“So it is very dysfunctional,” McCain said. 

“I think that it argues for us to be more united and spend our time against our adversary because we all share the same principles and values, and I’d like to see us do that,” he said. 

He avoided taking personal shots at Cruz, saying he had a good relationship with him.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee is blasting a number of red state Democratic senators Friday to vote against stripping the ObamaCare provision from a House-passed stopgap spending bill set to hit the Senate floor, according to CNN. 

They include Democratic Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganThe two women who could 'cancel' Trump 10 under-the-radar races to watch in November The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic Unity Taskforce unveils party platform recommendations MORE (N.C.), Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorBottom line Everybody wants Joe Manchin Cotton glides to reelection in Arkansas MORE (Ark.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska Senate race sees cash surge in final stretch Alaska group backing independent candidate appears linked to Democrats Sullivan wins Alaska Senate GOP primary MORE (Alaska) and Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuCassidy wins reelection in Louisiana Bottom line A decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth MORE (La.). They all hail from states that President Obama lost in last year’s presidential election. Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenLawmakers express horror at latest Capitol attack Five things to watch on Biden infrastructure plan Democrats wrestle over tax hikes for infrastructure MORE (D-N.H.) is also listed. 

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: Amazon wins union election — says 'our employees made the choice' Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists The growing threat of China's lawfare MORE (R-Fla.), another leader in the fight, took to Fox News Thursday night to call out those vulnerable Democrats up for reelection. But he admitted that it is unlikely they would break with their own party. 

“It is realistic that it could be defunded if four Democrats, or five, change their mind,” Rubio said. “The problem is that they're so locked into it. You have Democrats, by the way, that are from states where [2012 Republican presidential candidate] Mitt Romney [won]. So I can tell you, ObamaCare is not popular in those states.”

Senate Democrats are poised to strip the ObamaCare language Friday and send the funding measure back to the House. The Senate version would fund the government through Nov. 15. 

It's unclear what would happen next. The government will shut down on Oct. 1 without a deal.