President Trump tweeted Friday morning that former national security adviser Michael Flynn “should ask for immunity” to avoid a “witch hunt” — but he had a very different view of immunity six months ago.

Trump defended Flynn’s offer to testify in ongoing probes of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election in exchange for legal immunity.

But during last year’s campaign, Trump excoriated Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMatt Gaetz ahead of Mueller hearing: 'We are going to reelect the president' What to expect when Mueller testifies: Not much McConnell challenger faces tougher path after rocky launch MORE’s associates for getting immunity, asking: "If you're not guilty of a crime, what do you need immunity for?"

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Trump’s campaign repeatedly hammered the Department of Justice for granting immunity to a number of people, including top Clinton aide Cheryl Mills, during the investigation into Clinton’s use of a private email server while secretary of State, saying the deals were proof of corruption and calling for a special prosecutor.

Both Trump and Flynn heard near-constant crowd chants to “lock her up” during the campaign. 

“If I did a tenth of what she did, I would be in jail today,” Flynn said during a July speech at the Republican National Convention, adding that Clinton “believes she is above the law.”

During a presidential debate in October, Trump tweeted to Clinton: “Why did five of your staffers need FBI IMMUNITY?!”

And Flynn told NBC in September, “When you are given immunity, that means that you have probably committed a crime.”

Flynn's lawyer told The Wall Street Journal on Thursday that he’s willing to talk to the House and Senate Intelligence panels as part of their probes into Russian election meddling and Trump and his aides' alleged ties to Moscow — if he’s promised immunity.

Flynn resigned last month amid revelations that he misled Vice President Pence and others about meetings he had with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak before Trump took office.

Since then, Flynn has been the subject of controversy surrounding an apparent web of foreign business interests, including lobbying work that is said to have benefitted the Turkish government. Flynn registered as a foreign agent earlier this month.