Chaffetz not worried about Trump profiting from presidency: 'He's already rich'
© Greg Nash

Rep. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzLawmakers contemplate a tough political sell: Raising their pay Top Utah paper knocks Chaffetz as he mulls run for governor: ‘His political career should be over’ Boehner working on memoir: report MORE (R-Utah) is dismissing concerns over whether President Trump would use his office to pad out his personal fortune.

"He’s already rich," Chaffetz, the chairman of the House Oversight Committee, told The Atlantic in an interview published Friday. "He’s very rich. I don’t think that he ran for this office to line his pockets even more. I just don’t see it like that."

Trump, a real estate mogul who founded a business empire with properties and interests around the world, has waved off concerns about his potential conflicts of interest, all the while refusing to place his assets in a blind trust, as is typical of presidents.

As a candidate, Trump was the first major party nominee in nearly 40 years to refuse to release his tax returns.

ADVERTISEMENT

Since taking office, the president's properties, especially his Trump International Hotel in Washington, have attracted foreign officials and business leaders. The Trump Organization has said that it will donate its hotel profits made from foreign government officials to the U.S. Treasury, beginning in 2018.

But Trump's business interests raised questions once again in recent weeks after the Chinese government granted Trump 38 trademarks in the country. Trump had been trying to obtain trademarks in the country for a decade, leading to speculation that the trademarks were granted because of his presidency.

Chaffetz also waved offer a question about a New York Times report on White House senior adviser and Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner's family exploring a $400 million deal with a Chinese company. The deal was called off amid public scrutiny, but Chaffetz said he does not believe it is worthy of an Oversight Committee probe.

“I don’t see how that affects the average American and their taxpayer dollars,” Chaffetz said. “Just the fact that a staff person’s family is making money? It’s not enough.”