No Congress members along Mexico border support funding Trump's wall
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No member of Congress who represents districts on the U.S.-Mexico border support funding President Trump's signature border wall, The Wall Street Journal reported on Friday.

According to a survey conducted by the publication, no lawmaker representing the region expressed support for Trump’s request for $1.4 billion to begin construction of the project.

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The survey included nine members of the House and eight senators from Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California — including four Republican senators.

According to the report, some GOP lawmakers raised concerns about whether the wall is too focused on a physical barrier, rather than funding other high-tech solutions that could prove to be more effective.

“The solution must be a dynamic, multifaceted one,” Rep. Steve Pearce (R-N.M.) told the publication.

Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCruz targets California governor over housing 'prescriptions' This week: House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime Democrats: It's Trump's world, and we're just living in it MORE (R-Texas) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSanders says idea he can't work with Republicans is 'total nonsense' GOP casts Sanders as 2020 boogeyman Overnight Defense: GOP lawmaker takes unannounced trip to Syria | Taliban leader pens New York Times op-ed on peace talks | Cheney blasts paper for publishing op-ed MORE (R-Ariz.) have been skeptical about the president's plan, while Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeMcSally ties Democratic rival Kelly to Sanders in new ad McSally launches 2020 campaign Sinema will vote to convict Trump MORE (R-Ariz.) said that border security ought to be focused elsewhere, according to the Journal.
Sen. John CornynJohn CornynGOP casts Sanders as 2020 boogeyman Ocasio-Cortez announces slate of all-female congressional endorsements Trump Medicaid proposal sparks bipartisan warnings MORE (R-Texas) also reportedly voiced concerns about the measure, arguing that the wall could be too narrowly focused.