Luis Borunda, Maryland's deputy Secretary of State, has resigned from President Trump's controversial panel that is looking into possible voter fraud in the 2016 presidential election, the Baltimore Sun reported Monday.

Borunda reportedly told Gov. Larry Hogan (R) that he has resigned from the Trump administration's Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, the governor's spokesman Doug Mayer told the paper.

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"He informed our office he has resigned from the commission," Mayer said. 

In May, Trump created the panel in an executive order after making the baseless claim that millions of people cast illegal votes for Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBudowsky: Closing message for Democrats Election Countdown: Dems outraise GOP in final stretch | 2018 midterms already most expensive in history | What to watch in second Cruz-O'Rourke debate | Trump raises 0M for reelection | Why Dems fear Avenatti's approach GOP mocks Clinton after minor vehicle collision outside Mendendez campaign event MORE, his Democratic opponent. 

The Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity — formed by President Trump to investigate his widely debunked claim that millions of illegal votes cost him the popular vote in November's election — sent letters last week to the 50 secretaries of state across the country requesting information about voters. 

The letter asked for names, addresses, birth dates and party affiliations of registered voters in each state. It also sought felony convictions, military statuses, the last four digits of Social Security numbers and voting records dating back to 2006.

Borunda has not responded to the Sun's request for comment about his departure from the 15-person panel. 

The spokesman added that Borunda joined the president's commission "on his own," and the governor did not appoint him to the post.

The announcement of his role on the panel raised some eyebrows because Maryland's Secretary of State office, unlike some other states, has no hand in dealing with registering voters or overseeing the election.

In a letter to Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R), who serves as the vice chair of Trump’s advisory commission on election integrity, the Maryland state administrator of elections declined to fulfill the request from the commission.