A former aide to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump rallies in Nevada amid Supreme Court flurry: 'We're gonna get Brett' Trump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again Trump boosts Heller, hammers 'Wacky Jacky' opponent in Nevada MORE criticized Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandTeen girls pen open letter supporting Kavanaugh accuser: We imagine you at that party and 'see ourselves' Poll: Most Massachusetts voters don't think Warren should run for president in 2020 The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — GOP again has momentum on Kavanaugh rollercoaster MORE on Thursday after the New York Democrat became the first of many senators to join a successful push to force the resignation of Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenElection Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls #MeToo era shows there's almost never only one accuser, says Hill.TV's Krystal Ball Hypocrisy in Kavanaugh case enough to set off alarms in DC MORE (D-Minn.).

Philippe Reines argued during an appearance on Fox News's "Tucker Carlson Tonight" that Gillibrand isn't sufficiently explaining why she called for the resignation of Franken this week and former President Clinton previously.

"She's not putting in context her rationale for who she calls for resignation and when," Reines said Thursday. "She two weeks ago called for Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonTrump, GOP regain edge in Kavanaugh battle Presidential approval: It's the economy; except when it's not Hypocrisy in Kavanaugh case enough to set off alarms in DC MORE's resignation, or saying Bill Clinton should have resigned two decades ago."

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"[She] didn't really say why, she never said say she regretted not speaking earlier, or taking the Clintons' support or money," Reines continued. "And then goes a few weeks without saying anything on Sen. Franken until yesterday."

Reines reiterated that he thought Gillibrand, a possible 2020 Democratic presidential contender, had not explained her "rationale" for demanding these figures' resignations.

"That's not to say her decision was wrong. She was joined by 29 other senators," he added. "But most people have been discussing this in a framework of, 'If someone does this, it's unacceptable and they should resign.' It's unclear in the way she's been, in describing her actions, what that rationale is."

Reines, who served under Hillary Clinton at the State Department, has repeatedly attacked Gillibrand in recent weeks, labeling her a "hypocrite" last month after she argued that Bill Clinton should have resigned for his sexual misconduct in the White House.

"Her point was strange to me because she probably didn't come to this feeling and thought and position yesterday," Reines said on Fox News in November.

"Why she wouldn't have in the last 20 years vocalized it is strange to me. Nothing was stopping her."

Gillibrand responded to Reines on MSNBC, calling the former adviser "ridiculous" and "wrong."

"Ridiculous, and he's wrong," Gillibrand said at the time. "Bill Clinton did very important things for this country. But my point is about this conversation we are having today, and that we need to have the highest standards for elected leaders, and we have to change what's happening throughout society, and we have to allow people to tell their stories."