A former aide to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonYang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Top GOP legislator in California leaves party GOP senators request interview with former DNC contractor to probe possible Ukraine ties MORE criticized Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandWhite House, Congress near deal to give 12 weeks paid parental leave to all federal workers Bloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money' Harris posts video asking baby if she'll run for president one day MORE on Thursday after the New York Democrat became the first of many senators to join a successful push to force the resignation of Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenThe job no GOP senator wants: 'I'd rather have a root canal' Take Trump literally and seriously in Minnesota Ninth woman accuses Al Franken of inappropriate contact MORE (D-Minn.).

Philippe Reines argued during an appearance on Fox News's "Tucker Carlson Tonight" that Gillibrand isn't sufficiently explaining why she called for the resignation of Franken this week and former President Clinton previously.

"She's not putting in context her rationale for who she calls for resignation and when," Reines said Thursday. "She two weeks ago called for Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonThe Hill's Morning Report — Pelosi makes it official: Trump will be impeached Impeachment can't wait Turley: Democrats offering passion over proof in Trump impeachment MORE's resignation, or saying Bill Clinton should have resigned two decades ago."

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"[She] didn't really say why, she never said say she regretted not speaking earlier, or taking the Clintons' support or money," Reines continued. "And then goes a few weeks without saying anything on Sen. Franken until yesterday."

Reines reiterated that he thought Gillibrand, a possible 2020 Democratic presidential contender, had not explained her "rationale" for demanding these figures' resignations.

"That's not to say her decision was wrong. She was joined by 29 other senators," he added. "But most people have been discussing this in a framework of, 'If someone does this, it's unacceptable and they should resign.' It's unclear in the way she's been, in describing her actions, what that rationale is."

Reines, who served under Hillary Clinton at the State Department, has repeatedly attacked Gillibrand in recent weeks, labeling her a "hypocrite" last month after she argued that Bill Clinton should have resigned for his sexual misconduct in the White House.

"Her point was strange to me because she probably didn't come to this feeling and thought and position yesterday," Reines said on Fox News in November.

"Why she wouldn't have in the last 20 years vocalized it is strange to me. Nothing was stopping her."

Gillibrand responded to Reines on MSNBC, calling the former adviser "ridiculous" and "wrong."

"Ridiculous, and he's wrong," Gillibrand said at the time. "Bill Clinton did very important things for this country. But my point is about this conversation we are having today, and that we need to have the highest standards for elected leaders, and we have to change what's happening throughout society, and we have to allow people to tell their stories."