Scott Jennings, a special assistant to former President George W. Bush, celebrated House Republicans' passage of a sweeping tax overhaul on Tuesday with a simple phrase: "Bye, Felicia."

"Republicans in all wings of the party, frankly, have been annoyed by the high tax rates in this country, both personal and corporate, for a long time. They think they crush growth," Jennings said on CNN. 

"What Donald Trump, Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care — Presented by Purdue Pharma — Trump says GOP will support pre-existing condition protections | McConnell defends ObamaCare lawsuit | Dems raise new questions for HHS on child separations Poll finds Dems prioritize health care, GOP picks lower taxes when it's time to vote The Hill's 12:30 Report — Mnuchin won't attend Saudi conference | Pompeo advises giving Saudis 'few more days' to investigate | Trump threatens military action over caravan MORE [R-Ky.] and Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanThe Memo: Saudi storm darkens for Trump The Hill's 12:30 Report — Mnuchin won't attend Saudi conference | Pompeo advises giving Saudis 'few more days' to investigate | Trump threatens military action over caravan The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns MORE [R-Wis.] have done today is said, 'bye, Felicia,' " he added, referring to the president, Senate majority leader and Speaker, respectively.

"Goodbye high tax rates."

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The phrase "bye, Felicia" is a reference to the 1995 film "Friday." The quote has enjoyed viral popularity and is often used as a dismissive farewell. 

Jennings's comments came moments after the House approved the final version of a tax code rewrite, edging Republicans closer to their first major legislative victory during President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Guardian slams Trump over comments about assault on reporter Five takeaways from the first North Dakota Senate debate Watchdog org: Tillerson used million in taxpayer funds to fly throughout US MORE's tenure in the White House. 

The legislation cuts individual tax rates and slashes the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent. It also does away with or limits tax breaks, like the state and local tax deduction. 

The Senate is set to vote on the measure next, and is expected to pass it, fulfilling Republicans' promise to send the legislation to Trump's desk before Christmas.