A lawyer who once worked for former Alabama Senate candidate Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreAlabama Senate contender hits Sessions in new ad: 'Hillary still ain't in jail' The Hill's Campaign Report: Rising Klobuchar, Buttigieg face test in diverse states Sessions in close race for Alabama GOP Senate nomination: poll MORE (R) said in a new interview that he’s friends with Moore's former opponent, Sen.-elect Doug Jones (D), and raised money for Jones's campaign.

Birmingham, Ala., attorney Richard Jaffe received attention during the Alabama Senate campaign after Moore's wife, Kayla Moore, seeking to rebut allegations of anti-Semitism, told a campaign rally crowd that "one of our attorneys is a Jew," a reference to Jaffe.

But in an interview published Tuesday, Jaffe told the Washington Examiner that he has been friends with Jones for over 30 years and both raised and donated money to Jones’s Senate campaign.

"There could not be a more passionate supporter of Doug than me," Jaffe told the Examiner.

The newspaper reports that Jaffe represented Moore’s son Caleb Moore in 2016 in a case involving drug charges.

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In the final days of the contentious Alabama special election, Kayla Moore accused the media of portraying the couple as “anti-Semitic.”

“Fake news would tell you that we don’t care for Jews,” Kayla Moore said at the campaign’s final rally last month.

“I tell you all this because I’ve seen it all, so I just want to set the record straight while they’re here,” she continued, gesturing at the media assembled at the rally. “One of our attorneys is a Jew.”

“We have very close friends that are Jewish, and rabbis, we also do fellowship with them.”

Jones went on to win the election last month, an upset in the heavily Republican state.

Moore faced multiple accusations of sexual misconduct involving teenagers, and once suggested billionaire Democratic donor George Soros is going to hell.

“No matter how much money he’s got, he’s still going to the same place that people who don’t recognize God and morality and accept his salvation are going,” Moore said. “And that’s not a good place.”