Former Watergate prosecutor Nick Ackerman said on Wednesday that any alleged quid pro quo between the Trump campaign and Russia's election meddling would lie in the Trump administration dropping U.S. sanctions against Russia. 

"What we're dealing with here is a conspiracy to break into the Democratic National Committee, steal emails, and use those emails to help Trump get elected, and the quid pro quo for that was the dropping of sanctions," Ackerman told MSNBC's Chris Hayes. 

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"What was left out of this whole narrative was the one end with Michael Flynn, who was dealing with the Russian ambassador over sanctions, and the whole notion that the Trump administration was going to get rid of all of the sanctions after he took office," he continued. 

NBC News reported on Wednesday that special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE's investigators have inquired about whether President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrumps light 97th annual National Christmas Tree Trump to hold campaign rally in Michigan 'Don't mess with Mama': Pelosi's daughter tweets support following press conference comments MORE was aware of plans for WikiLeaks to publish emails from the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and members of Hillary Clinton’s campaign, or if Trump was involved in the emails’ release.

Russians were able to successfully hack into Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta’s email account in the spring of 2016 before WikiLeaks released stolen emails from the DNC as well as emails from Podesta himself in the months leading up to the 2016 election.

Amid the leaks, Trump said "I love WikiLeaks" at a campaign rally. 

"Russia, if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing," Trump said on the campaign trail. 

The White House said the comments were made in jest. 

Trump has repeatedly denied any collusion between his campaign and the Kremlin, referring to the probe as "a witch hunt."