Former Watergate prosecutor Jill Wine-Banks said Friday that outgoing White House communications director Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksPress: Acosta, latest to walk the plank Kellyanne Conway defies congressional subpoena at Trump's direction Republican lawmakers on why they haven't read Mueller report: 'Tedious' and 'what's the point?' MORE could face liability if she was involved in covering up Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump retreats on census citizenship question Trump set to host controversial social media summit Trump associate Felix Sater grilled by House Intel MORE's meeting with Russians.

Wine-Banks told People that special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTop Republican considered Mueller subpoena to box in Democrats Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE, who is investigating Russian meddling in the election, will pay close attention to Hick’s involvement in crafting a statement responding to the June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower.

Hicks reportedly helped draft Trump Jr.’s initial misleading statement about his meeting with a Russian lawyer. The president's eldest son said the meeting centered around Russian adoptions, while it later became known that he attended the meeting after being promised dirt about Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWhy Trump's bigoted tropes won't work in 2020 The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet GOP put on the back foot by Trump's race storm MORE's campaign.

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“If [President TrumpDonald John TrumpEsper sidesteps question on whether he aligns more with Mattis or Trump Warren embraces Thiel label: 'Good' As tensions escalate, US must intensify pressure on Iran and the IAEA MORE] is asking her, ‘How do I cover up the fact that my son had this illegal meeting?’ and she says it is about a different subject, he discussed adoptions, that is criminal conduct,” Wine-Banks said Friday. “And her liability for that criminal conduct, for being part of a cover-up, exists in or out of the White House, as does the president’s.”

Hicks testified for hours on Tuesday before the House Intelligence Committee about her work for the Trump campaign. She garnered attention for saying during the testimony that she has occasionally told “white lies.”

The next day, she announced her resignation, though the White House said that it was coming before her testimony before the committee on Tuesday.

Hicks declined to answer several questions during her testimony, something Wine-Banks told People was inappropriate.

“There is no executive privilege for criminal conduct,” Wine-Banks said. “For example, with Hope Hicks being involved with drafting a false report about the June meeting, that is not protected by privilege and anything the president told her in connection with that drafting to extent he he dictated to that, she will have to testify about that.”

Wine-Banks served on the staff of special prosecutor Leon Jaworski during the Watergate investigation.