Hillary Clinton to receive Harvard's Radcliffe Award
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Former presidential hopeful Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSusan Collins signals she won't campaign against Biden Cuccinelli says rule forcing international students to return home will 'encourage schools to reopen' Clinton labels ICE decision on international students 'cruel' and 'unnecessary' MORE will receive an award in May for her impact on society from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, according to a press release.

Clinton, a former secretary of State, will receive the Radcliffe Medal on May 25, an award that recognizes individuals who have had a "transformative impact" on society.

Past award recipients include Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, former Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenCBO: Prior COVID-19 emergency bills will add .4 trillion to deficit How lawmaker ties helped shape Fed chairman's COVID-19 response Fed chair issues dire warnings on economy MORE and former Sen. Elizabeth Dole (R-N.C.). 

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“Hillary Clinton’s life and career are an inspiration to people around the world,” Radcliffe Institute Dean Lizabeth Cohen, who teaches American studies at Harvard, said in the press release.

“Whether in Arkansas, Washington, D.C., New York state or traveling around the globe as secretary of State,” Cohen said in the statement. “Secretary Clinton has provided a model of what it takes to transform society, often under scrutiny — tireless effort, toughness amid the political fray, and an enduring capacity to envision a better future.”

The event in May will feature a tribute to Clinton delivered by friend, former secretary of State and fellow Radcliffe medalist Madeleine Albright, according to the release, as well as a conversation between Clinton and Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey (D).

Clinton, who ran unsuccessfully against President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Jersey incumbents steamroll progressive challengers in primaries Tucker Carlson ratchets up criticism of Duckworth, calls her a 'coward' Trump on Confederate flag: 'It's freedom of speech' MORE in 2016, was the first woman to secure a nomination for president from a major political party in the United States.

In the statement, Radcliffe added that Clinton was a "skilled legislator,” and “an advocate of American leadership to create a world in which states live up to their responsibilities.”

“We commend Secretary Clinton for her accomplishments in the public sphere as a champion for human rights and the welfare of all," Cohen said.