Met opera fires conductor after sexual misconduct probe

The Metropolitan Opera in New York City announced on Monday it fired famed conductor James Levine after the conclusion of an investigation into sexual misconduct allegations against him.

The Met told The New York Times in a statement it had “uncovered credible evidence that Mr. Levine engaged in sexually abusive and harassing conduct toward vulnerable artists in the early stages of their careers, over whom Mr. Levine had authority."

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The company said they found evidence of abuse and harassment “both before and during the period” he worked at the opera.

“In light of these findings, the Met concludes that it would be inappropriate and impossible for Mr. Levine to continue to work at the Met," the statement said.

The company suspended Levine in December in light of the allegations, which span from the 1960s through the 1980s.

The Boston Globe reported earlier this month that three of Levine's accusers said the conductor abused them when they were teenagers. 

Levine has denied the allegations, calling them "unfounded." 

Levine is the latest high profile male figure to lose his job amid sexual misconduct allegations. 

Movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, morning television hosts Charlie RoseCharles Peete RoseConway to CNN's Cuomo in heated debate: 'I'll walk away' if you continue to interrupt me #MeToo era shows there's almost never only one accuser, says Hill.TV's Krystal Ball '60 Minutes' chief out at CBS amid harassment allegations MORE and Matt LauerMatthew (Matt) Todd LauerConway to CNN's Cuomo in heated debate: 'I'll walk away' if you continue to interrupt me #MeToo era shows there's almost never only one accuser, says Hill.TV's Krystal Ball 'Tonight Show’ cancels Norm Macdonald appearance after #MeToo comments MORE, former Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenNelson campaign to donate K from Al Franken group to charity Sexual assault is not a game — stop using women to score political points Election Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls MORE (D-Minn.) and former Rep. John ConyersJohn James ConyersSexual assault is not a game — stop using women to score political points Congressional Ethics committees are the wrong place to settle harassment and discrimination claims Conservative activist disrupts campaign event for Muslim candidates MORE Jr. (D-Mich.) all lost their positions amid allegations.