Holder group will fight citizenship question on census
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A Democratic group headed by former U.S. Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderFBI, Justice Dept plan to redact Russia documents despite Trump order for full declassification: report Dem lawmakers slam Trump’s declassification of Russia documents as ‘brazen abuse of power’ Dem lawmaker jabs Trump call for transparency by asking for his tax returns MORE will go to court over a decision by the Commerce Department to include a question about citizenship on the 2020 census.

Holder said Tuesday that the group, the National Democratic Redistricting Committee, would fight the Trump administration's decision, arguing that including a citizenship question would drastically lower the response rate on the 2020 census and lead to an inaccurate count.

"We will litigate to stop the Administration from moving forward with this irresponsible decision," Holder said. "The addition of a citizenship question to the census questionnaire is a direct attack on our representative democracy."

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Holder's announcement came a day after Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossThe seafood trade deficit is a diversionary tactic Wilbur Ross is wrong; the pain from the trade war is coming The booming economy trumps Trump's trade battle with China MORE said that the Census Bureau would reinstate a question about individuals' citizenship status on the 2020 census, despite objections from Democrats on the matter.

Under Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHillicon Valley: Trump cyber strategy lets US go on offense | AT&T urges court to let Time Warner merger stand | Conservatives want wife of DOJ official to testify | Facebook, nonprofits team up to fight fake news | DC camera hacker pleads guilty Vote Democrat in midterms to rein in Trump, preserve justice Sessions limits ability of judges to dismiss deportation cases MORE, the Justice Department has argued that including such a question would help it enforce the 1965 Voting Rights Act, a notion Holder rejected.

"Make no mistake — this decision is motivated purely by politics," Holder said. "In deciding to add this question without even testing its effects, the Administration is departing from decades of census policy and ignoring the warnings of census experts."

California Attorney General Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraIndustry wins big in methane rules rollback Overnight Energy: Watchdog to investigate EPA over Hurricane Harvey | Panel asks GAO to expand probe into sexual harassment in science | States sue over methane rules rollback Some states back plaintiff suing DHS over Haitians' protected status MORE (D) also said late Monday that he would file a lawsuit over the Commerce Department's decision.

"We're prepared to do what we must to protect California from a deficient Census," Becerra said in a statement. "Including a citizenship question on the 2020 census is not just a bad idea — it is illegal."