Holder group will fight citizenship question on census
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A Democratic group headed by former U.S. Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderHolder: ‘Make America Great’ mindset flawed, rooted in fear Overnight Defense: Trump marks 9/11 anniversary | Mattis says Assad 'has been warned' on chemical weapons | US identifies first remains of returned Korean war troops Eric Holder blasts Trump for Twitter attack on 9/11 MORE will go to court over a decision by the Commerce Department to include a question about citizenship on the 2020 census.

Holder said Tuesday that the group, the National Democratic Redistricting Committee, would fight the Trump administration's decision, arguing that including a citizenship question would drastically lower the response rate on the 2020 census and lead to an inaccurate count.

"We will litigate to stop the Administration from moving forward with this irresponsible decision," Holder said. "The addition of a citizenship question to the census questionnaire is a direct attack on our representative democracy."

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Holder's announcement came a day after Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossTrump moving forward with additional 0 billion in tariffs on Chinese goods: report Here are the administration officials who have denied they wrote the anonymous NYT op-ed CNN: Trump searching for Woodward sources in White House MORE said that the Census Bureau would reinstate a question about individuals' citizenship status on the 2020 census, despite objections from Democrats on the matter.

Under Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Hill’s 12:30 Report — Kavanaugh accuser willing to testify | Kavanaugh denies allegations, says he’s willing to testify | 50 days from the midterms Ken Starr backs Mueller, says president 'must be held accountable' The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil MORE, the Justice Department has argued that including such a question would help it enforce the 1965 Voting Rights Act, a notion Holder rejected.

"Make no mistake — this decision is motivated purely by politics," Holder said. "In deciding to add this question without even testing its effects, the Administration is departing from decades of census policy and ignoring the warnings of census experts."

California Attorney General Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraJudge rules against DeVos rollback of Obama-era student loan regulations Federal court rules Koch-linked group must disclose donors to California Exxon appeals Massachusetts climate case to Supreme Court MORE (D) also said late Monday that he would file a lawsuit over the Commerce Department's decision.

"We're prepared to do what we must to protect California from a deficient Census," Becerra said in a statement. "Including a citizenship question on the 2020 census is not just a bad idea — it is illegal."