President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump announces new tranche of endorsements DeSantis, Pence tied in 2024 Republican poll Lawmakers demand changes after National Guard troops at Capitol sickened from tainted food MORE’s personal lawyer, Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenThe Memo: Trump faces deepening legal troubles Trump lashes out after Supreme Court decision on his financial records Supreme Court declines to shield Trump's tax returns from Manhattan DA MORE, was reportedly able to get Us Weekly magazine to pull a story about Donald Trump Jr.Don TrumpTrump: 'I can't imagine' any Republican would beat me in 2024 primary if I run Trump Jr.: There are 'plenty' of GOP incumbents who should be challenged Donald Trump Jr. attacks Cheney at CPAC: 'Lincoln Project Liz' MORE’s alleged affair with a "Celebrity Apprentice" contestant. 

The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday that Cohen got the tabloid to kill the story in 2013, according to people familiar with the matter.

Trump Jr. had been a judge a year earlier on his father’s reality television show.

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The younger Trump allegedly had a relationship with one of the show’s contestants, Aubrey O’Day, who was half of a singing duo called Dumblonde, the Journal reported.

Trump Jr. announced in March that he was separating from his wife of 12 years, Vanessa Trump.

Cohen’s office and home were raided by the FBI last week as investigators searched for documents relating to Cohen’s handling of President Trump’s alleged affairs.

Agents were reportedly looking for information on Karen McDougal, a former Playboy model who says she had an affair with Trump.

Last month, McDougal sued American Media Inc. (AMI), the company that owns the National Enquirer, so she could break her silence about the alleged affair. AMI paid her $150,000 for her story and then withheld it from publication.

Federal prosecutors also wanted documents related to Cohen’s payment to adult-film star Stormy Daniels, who similarly claims she had an affair with Trump.

Cohen admitted to paying Daniels $130,000, reportedly as part of a nondisclosure agreement, just days before the 2016 presidential election.

Cohen established Essential Consultants, a Delaware limited liability company, to secretly pay Clifford.

On Sunday, the Journal also reported that Cohen had used the same company in two other secret deals relating to alleged sexual encounters involving his other clients.

It was reported on Friday that Cohen had settled a $1.6 million settlement for a top Republican fundraiser whom a former Playboy model says impregnated her.

Elliott Broidy stepped down from his post at the Republican National Committee on Friday.