Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellVoters must strongly reject the president's abuses by voting him out this November Democrats face tough questions with Bolton Twitter, Facebook see new tactics in foreign disinformation efforts MORE (D-Calif.) said Monday that he doesn’t have faith in the bipartisan response to protect special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE from being fired by President TrumpDonald John TrumpSecret Service members who helped organize Pence Arizona trip test positive for COVID-19: report Trump administration planning pandemic office at the State Department: report Iran releases photo of damaged nuclear fuel production site: report MORE, adding that “actions speak louder than tweets or words.”

“I want to see the bill on the floor and people having to say ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ ” Swalwell said on CNN while criticizing lawmakers for not advancing legislation to protect the Justice Department's Russia investigation from White House interference.

“Right now, it’s just talk and with this president, we know how he responds to just talk,” Swalwell said.

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“We need to put that bill on his desk and make him make a real decision rather than just benefiting from members saying what they are or are not going to do."

Swalwell said Congress must pass legislation Trump to understand the consequences he would face if he fired Mueller or Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinSupreme Court to hear dispute over Democrats' access to Mueller materials Republicans release newly declassified intelligence document on FBI source Steele GOP's Obama-era probes fuel Senate angst MORE.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have expressed support for Mueller but a bill to protect him has stalled in the Senate Judiciary Committee, with a vote not expected until April 26. 

Sens. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisACLU calls on Congress to approve COVID-19 testing for immigrants Poll: Biden, Trump locked in neck-and-neck battle for North Carolina GOP senator: Russia should be labeled state sponsor of terrorism if intelligence is accurate MORE (R-N.C.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamHillicon Valley: Senate panel advances bill targeting online child sexual abuse | Trump administration awards tech group contract to build 'virtual' wall | Advocacy groups urge Congress to ban facial recognition technologies Senate panel advances bill targeting online child sexual abuse The Hill's Campaign Report: The political heavyweights in Tuesday's primary fights MORE (R-S.C.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSenators push foreign media to disclose if they are registered as foreign agents Joe Biden must release the results of his cognitive tests — voters need to know GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday MORE (D-N.J.) and Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsHillicon Valley: Facebook takes down 'boogaloo' network after pressure | Election security measure pulled from Senate bill | FCC officially designating Huawei, ZTE as threats Democrats, voting rights groups pressure Senate to approve mail-in voting resources To safeguard our elections, Democrats and Republicans must work together MORE (D-Del.) introduced legislation last week that would restrict Trump's ability to fire the special counsel.

Tillis slammed his colleagues who are blocking his bill, saying they would demand the same bill if Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCarville repeats prediction that Trump will drop out of race What's behind Trump's slump? Americans are exhausted, for one thing Trump campaign reserves air time in New Mexico MORE were president.