Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris 2020 Democrats commemorate 20-year anniversary of Columbine shooting Hillicon Valley: House Dems subpoena full Mueller report | DOJ pushes back at 'premature' subpoena | Dems reject offer to view report with fewer redactions | Trump camp runs Facebook ads about Mueller report | Uber gets B for self-driving cars MORE (D-Calif.) said Monday that he doesn’t have faith in the bipartisan response to protect special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE from being fired by President TrumpDonald John TrumpThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Obama condemns attacks in Sri Lanka as 'an attack on humanity' Schiff rips Conway's 'display of alternative facts' on Russian election interference MORE, adding that “actions speak louder than tweets or words.”

“I want to see the bill on the floor and people having to say ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ ” Swalwell said on CNN while criticizing lawmakers for not advancing legislation to protect the Justice Department's Russia investigation from White House interference.

“Right now, it’s just talk and with this president, we know how he responds to just talk,” Swalwell said.

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“We need to put that bill on his desk and make him make a real decision rather than just benefiting from members saying what they are or are not going to do."

Swalwell said Congress must pass legislation Trump to understand the consequences he would face if he fired Mueller or Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Jay RosensteinKellyanne Conway: Mueller didn't need to use the word 'exoneration' in report Impeachment? Not so fast without missing element of criminal intent Collins: Mueller report includes 'an unflattering portrayal' of Trump MORE.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have expressed support for Mueller but a bill to protect him has stalled in the Senate Judiciary Committee, with a vote not expected until April 26. 

Sens. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisPro-life Christians are demanding pollution protections Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 Abrams: Schumer has been 'relentless but thoughtful' about Senate bid MORE (R-N.C.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamHillicon Valley: House Dems subpoena full Mueller report | DOJ pushes back at 'premature' subpoena | Dems reject offer to view report with fewer redactions | Trump camp runs Facebook ads about Mueller report | Uber gets B for self-driving cars DOJ: Dem subpoena for Mueller report is 'premature and unnecessary' Dems reject Barr's offer to view Mueller report with fewer redactions MORE (R-S.C.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' 2020 Dems ratchet up anti-corporate talk in bid to woo unions MORE (D-N.J.) and Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsMenendez, Rubio lead Senate effort to regulate Venezuelan sanctions Dem report questions State Dept. decision to revoke award to Trump critic Senate Dem calls on Trump to apologize for attacks on McCain MORE (D-Del.) introduced legislation last week that would restrict Trump's ability to fire the special counsel.

Tillis slammed his colleagues who are blocking his bill, saying they would demand the same bill if Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Nadler: I don't understand why Mueller didn't charge Donald Trump Jr., others in Trump Tower meeting Kellyanne Conway: Mueller didn't need to use the word 'exoneration' in report MORE were president.