Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellHickenlooper ends presidential bid Scenes from Iowa State Fair: Surging Warren, Harris draw big crowds Nadler hits gas on impeachment MORE (D-Calif.) said Monday that he doesn’t have faith in the bipartisan response to protect special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony Kellyanne Conway: 'I'd like to know' if Mueller read his own report MORE from being fired by President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE, adding that “actions speak louder than tweets or words.”

“I want to see the bill on the floor and people having to say ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ ” Swalwell said on CNN while criticizing lawmakers for not advancing legislation to protect the Justice Department's Russia investigation from White House interference.

“Right now, it’s just talk and with this president, we know how he responds to just talk,” Swalwell said.

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“We need to put that bill on his desk and make him make a real decision rather than just benefiting from members saying what they are or are not going to do."

Swalwell said Congress must pass legislation Trump to understand the consequences he would face if he fired Mueller or Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinWhy the presumption of innocence doesn't apply to Trump McCabe sues FBI, DOJ, blames Trump for his firing Rosenstein: Trump should focus on preventing people from 'becoming violent white supremacists' MORE.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have expressed support for Mueller but a bill to protect him has stalled in the Senate Judiciary Committee, with a vote not expected until April 26. 

Sens. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisThe United States broken patent system is getting worse Gun reform groups to pressure GOP senators with rallies in all 50 states To cash in on innovation, remove market barriers for advanced energy technologies MORE (R-N.C.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham warns Trump on Taliban deal in Afghanistan: Learn from 'Obama's mistakes' Appropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid Trump meets with national security team on Afghanistan peace plan MORE (R-S.C.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination We need a climate plan for agriculture MORE (D-N.J.) and Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsThe United States broken patent system is getting worse Biden faces scrutiny for his age from other Democrats Democrats press FBI for details on Kavanaugh investigation MORE (D-Del.) introduced legislation last week that would restrict Trump's ability to fire the special counsel.

Tillis slammed his colleagues who are blocking his bill, saying they would demand the same bill if Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonLewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' Fighter pilot vs. astronaut match-up in Arizona could determine control of Senate Progressive Democrats' turnout plans simply don't add up MORE were president.