Young people sue Florida governor to force action on climate change
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A group of young people on Monday sued Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) to force him to take action on climate change.

The group of eight young Florida residents — represented by Oregon-based Our Children's Trust — sued Scott to demand that the state begin working on a court-ordered, science-based "Climate Recovery Plan," the Miami Herald reported.

The group, which is reportedly made up of individuals ranging from 10 to 20 years old, is alleging Scott is not taking steps to combat climate change.

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The suit says Scott and his administration have not passed any legislation meant to measure or curb carbon emissions. It also accuses the Florida governor and his administration of not doing anything regarding the threat of rising seas on the coasts.

One of the plaintiffs, Delaney Reynolds, an 18-year-old who attends University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, said she finds Florida's response to climate change "completely unacceptable."

"Gov. Scott says he's not a scientist," she said. "Well, neither are most of the people that are forced to take action because the state is failing us."

Andrea Rodgers, senior attorney at Our Children's Trust, said she expects the case will go before a jury before the end of the year.

"We want these stories in the courtroom, because once that happens the law is on our side," Rodgers said.

Scott's spokesman, McKinley Lewis, defended the governor's stance in a statement.

“The Governor signed one of the largest environmental protection budgets in Florida’s history last month – investing $4 billion into Florida’s environment," the statement said.

"The Governor is focused on real solutions to protect our environment – not political theater or a lawsuit orchestrated by a group based in Eugene, Oregon.”

Florida continues to face increasing risks due to climate change. By 2070, the streets of Miami could flood every day due to climate change, according to new research from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

In the past, Scott has said he is not a "scientist" when questioned about climate change. He has also previously voiced his support for President TrumpDonald John TrumpGrassley: Dems 'withheld information' on new Kavanaugh allegation Health advocates decry funding transfer over migrant children Groups plan mass walkout in support of Kavanaugh accuser MORE's decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement.

Scott earlier this month formally announced he will run for Senate, challenging Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonNelson campaign to donate K from Al Franken group to charity Political shenanigans mask true problems in Puerto Rico The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — The Hill interviews President Trump MORE (D).