Harvard law professor: Impeachment could worsen political dysfunction, polarization
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Harvard Law School professor Laurence Tribe warned against impeaching President TrumpDonald John Trump Former US ambassador: 'Denmark is not a big fan of Donald Trump and his politics' Senate Democrats push for arms control language in defense policy bill Detroit county sheriff endorses Booker for president MORE on Sunday, implying the process could worsen political dysfunction and polarization. 

"It's important that we not exacerbate the dysfunction and the polarization in the society that helped Donald Trump rise to power in the first place," Tribe told CNN's Fareed Zakaria. 

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"If we were to use the impeachment power simply as a substitute for buyer's remorse, saying 'We thought this guy was terrible, but he's even worse,' if we were going to use it against ambient badness, rather than clear abuse of power — we would really use the impeachment power to undermine, rather than save, our democracy," he continued. 

Various congressional Democrats have floated the idea of impeaching Trump if he were to fire Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Rosenstein10 declassified Russia collusion revelations that could rock Washington this fall Why the presumption of innocence doesn't apply to Trump McCabe sues FBI, DOJ, blames Trump for his firing MORE and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE, who is investigating alleged ties between the Trump campaign and Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. 

Rosenstein is overseeing the probe. 

Rep. Brendan Boyle (D-Pa.) said last month that he would introduce articles of impeachment against Trump if he fired Rosenstein, while Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSenate Democrats push for arms control language in defense policy bill Top adviser on Sanders: 'He's always been underestimated' 'The Simpsons' pokes fun at Trump's feud with 'the squad' MORE (D-Calif.) said firing the special counsel would be an impeachable offense. 

Still, others have cautioned against impeaching Trump ahead of the 2018 midterm elections.

"You can't jump the gun and determine that somebody should be impeached when you're going to be voting on the impeachment issue," Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSenate Democrats push for arms control language in defense policy bill Top adviser on Sanders: 'He's always been underestimated' 'The Simpsons' pokes fun at Trump's feud with 'the squad' MORE (I-Vt.) told NBC's Chuck Todd on "Meet the Press" Sunday.

"So, I think you allow the Mueller investigation to do its course. You fight against anybody who wants to impede that investigation. But I think it is too early to talk about impeachment."