President TrumpDonald John TrumpBill Kristol resurfaces video of Pence calling Obama executive action on immigration a 'profound mistake' ACLU says planned national emergency declaration is 'clear abuse of presidential power' O'Rourke says he'd 'absolutely' take down border wall near El Paso if he could MORE said Friday that he will likely support a bipartisan bill, introduced by Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren's 'ultra wealth' tax is misleading Hillicon Valley: New York says goodbye to Amazon's HQ2 | AOC reacts: 'Anything is possible' | FTC pushes for record Facebook fine | Cyber threats to utilities on the rise O’Rourke heading to Wisconsin amid 2020 speculation MORE (D-Mass.) and Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerBipartisan Senators reintroduce legislation to slap new sanctions on Russia Dems seeking path to Senate majority zero-in on Sun Belt Lawmakers eager for 5G breakthrough MORE (R-Colo.), to allow states to regulate marijuana without federal interference.

"I support Sen. Gardner. I know exactly what he's doing," Trump told reporters. "We're looking at it. But I probably will end up supporting that, yes."

A day earlier, Garner and Warren, who both represent states with legal recreational marijuana, introduced the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States Act, in response to increasing opposition toward the substance from Trump's Department of Justice.

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The bipartisan bill would amend the Controlled Substances Act to include a framework that says it no longer applies to those following state, territory or tribal laws “relating to the manufacture, production, possession, distribution, dispensation, administration, or delivery of [marijuana]."

The two senators announced a partnership on the legislation in April in an effort to hold Trump to his word about favoring a states-rights approach to recreational pot, a position he voiced during the 2016 presidential race.

Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsMcCabe book: Sessions once said FBI was better off when it 'only hired Irishmen' Senate confirms Trump pick William Barr as new attorney general Rod Rosenstein’s final insult to Congress: Farewell time for reporters but not testimony MORE, a staunch opponent of marijuana legalization, in January rolled back the so-called Cole memo, which ordered U.S. attorneys in states where the substance has been legalized to deprioritize prosecution of marijuana-related cases.

Warren said the goal of the legislation is to “ensure that each state has the right to determine for itself the best approach to marijuana within its borders.”

Medical marijuana is legal in more than two dozen states and recreational marijuana is legal in nine states and Washington, D.C.