Utah's GOP lieutenant governor slams family separation policy: ‘I want to punch someone’
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The Republican lieutenant governor of Utah said he wants to “punch someone” over the Trump administration’s controversial immigration policy.

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“Can’t sleep tonight. I know I shouldn’t tweet. But I’m angry. And sad. I hate what we’ve become. My wife wants to go & hold babies & read to lonely/scared/sad kids,” Spencer Cox tweeted Wednesday morning. “I want to punch someone. Political tribalism is stupid. It sucks & it’s dangerous. We are all part of the problem.”

“Some in my party are doing and supporting things I never thought possible. You won’t believe me, but your party is capable of it too. We get what we deserve. If we want change, we have to change ourselves,” the Utah Republican continued, adding that he will “probably” delete his tweets later in the morning. 

Cox also tweeted on the issue Sunday, agreeing with former first lady Laura Bush's scathing op-ed condemning Trump for the “zero tolerance” immigration policy, calling the measure “cruel” and “immoral.”

Cox’s remarks arrive as more visuals and accounts from inside immigrant detention centers emerge, prompting considerable criticism from both Republicans and Democrats.

The controversial immigration policy introduced by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Ocasio-Cortez fires back at Washington Times after story on her 'high-dollar hairdo' Trump's tirades, taunts and threats are damaging our democracy MORE last month seeks prosecution for any adult crossing the border illegally, though President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he doesn't want NYT in the White House Veterans group backs lawsuits to halt Trump's use of military funding for border wall Schiff punches back after GOP censure resolution fails MORE has falsely claimed that Democrats are to blame for the measure.

Border agents have reportedly separated more than 2,000 children from parents as part of the new policy since the strict enforcement began.