Anonymous man saves family’s home after parents are deported: report
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An anonymous donor stepped up to help three young siblings living in Bridgeton, N.J., after their parents were deported. 

The volunteer has offered to pay the mortgage on the house where the siblings are living as well as other bills for the next two years, CNN reported on Monday, after parents Humberta and Oscar Campos were deported to Mexico around Christmas last year. 

They were forced to leave behind Oscar Jr., Janet and Erwing, who have been struggling to continue paying for the mortgage on their home.

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CNN wrote about the family in May and other donations, totaling more than $10,000, have been coming in since the feature.

The anonymous donor is also giving the siblings $6,000 for a trip to Mexico to visit their parents.

The Camposes had entered the country illegally more than three decades ago and were deported after their stay of removal was no longer granted.

Before their deportation, they reportedly paid all of their taxes and ran a lawn-care business, which has been temporarily taken over by an uncle.

A spokesman with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) confirmed to the network that neither parent had a criminal record or broken any laws — except entering the country illegally.

"While ICE focuses its enforcement resources on individuals who pose a threat to national security, public safety and border security, the agency no longer exempts classes or categories of removable aliens from potential enforcement," an ICE spokesperson told CNN.

Oscar and Humberta Campos are now banned from returning to the U.S. for 10 years.

Oscar Campos Jr., 24, has been working as a security guard. 

Janet Campos, 22, was forced to put her college courses on hold in order to pay for the families' expenses. She will now be able to restart her classes in the fall, CNN reported.

The youngest, 15-year-old Erwing, can continue focusing on school with the help of the stranger’s support.

Immigration has been at the forefront of a national debate in recent weeks following President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump pushes back on recent polling data, says internal numbers are 'strongest we've had so far' Illinois state lawmaker apologizes for photos depicting mock assassination of Trump Scaramucci assembling team of former Cabinet members to speak out against Trump MORE's decision to implement a zero tolerance policy that aggressively prosecutes all individuals who enter the country illegally. 

The policy, however, led to more than 2,000 migrant children being separated from their parents after the families illegally crossed the southern border. 

Trump signed an executive order earlier this month to end the practice of detaining migrant parents and children at separate facilities, yet hundreds of migrant families have not been reunited. 

Hundreds of thousands of protesters marched all over the country on Saturday in "Families Belong Together" rallies to protest the Trump administration's stance on immigration.