Giuliani worked for foreign clients while serving as Trump's attorney: report
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Rudy Giuliani is reportedly still working on behalf of foreign clients months after joining President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rallies in Nevada amid Supreme Court flurry: 'We're gonna get Brett' Trump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again Trump boosts Heller, hammers 'Wacky Jacky' opponent in Nevada MORE’s legal team, raising conflict of interest concerns. 

According to The Washington Post, the New York attorney is still working with clients through his security firm, Giuliani Partners, even though he said prior to joining Trump's legal team in April that he was not involved with the company.

The Post reported that one of the clients reportedly is Kharkiv, Ukraine, whose mayor was a prominent figure in the Party of Regions political party. The newspaper notes the political party was at the center of a federal conspiracy prosecution involving Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortCohen questioned for hours in Mueller probe about Trump's dealings with Russia: report Vote Democrat in midterms to rein in Trump, preserve justice Hillicon Valley: Trump's exclusive interview with Hill.TV | Trump, intel officials clash over Russia docs | EU investigating Amazon | Military gets new cyber authority | Flynn sentencing sparks new questions about Mueller probe MORE.

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Iranian resistance group Mujahideen-e-Khalq, also known as MEK, is another client represented by Giuliani, according to the Post, which added that the group was reportedly labeled a terrorist group in 2012 and is operating in exile. The president’s attorney confirmed that he has been receiving payments from the group over the past decade. 

Lobbying experts told the newspaper that Giuliani’s work at the firm raises conflict of interest concerns and added that the lawyer’s work more than likely requires registration under the Foreign Agent Registration Act (FARA). That law, passed in 1938, requires agents representing foreign powers’ interests in a "political or quasi-political capacity" to disclose their relationship with the foreign government in addition to information surrounding related activities and finances.

If Giuliani is found operating in violation of that law, he could face up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine, the Post noted. 

Giuliani told the Post that he never discusses his clients with the president and has turned away potential clients, including a Russian business.