Avenatti on fighting Trump: ‘When they go low, we hit harder’
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Attorney Michael Avenatti vowed Wednesday that he would keep up his offensive against President TrumpDonald John TrumpRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports Allies wary of Shanahan's assurances with looming presence of Trump States file lawsuit seeking to block Trump's national emergency declaration MORE for the remainder of Trump's first term in office.

In a tweet, the attorney representing adult-film star Stormy Daniels wrote that "when they go low, we hit harder," an apparent riff on former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaBarack, Michelle Obama expected to refrain from endorsing in 2020 Dem primary: report Ex-W.Va. official who made racist Michelle Obama remark defrauded ,000 from FEMA: report GOP senator dedicates heart photo to wife from Senate floor for Valentine's Day MORE's remarks at the 2016 Democratic National Convention.

"Different people have different approaches at different times. Here is mine for the next two and half years: WHEN THEY GO LOW, WE HIT HARDER," Avenatti tweeted, adding the hashtags "#Basta" and "#FightClub."

Avenatti has pursued an aggressive media strategy since taking over representation of Daniels's case, which accuses Trump and his former lawyer, Michael Cohen, of defamation. Trump and Cohen deny Daniels's claims of a 2006 affair with Trump.

The attorney frequently appears on cable news to taunt the president and his allies, and has hinted that he would be open to working with Cohen against his former employer after Cohen revealed a recording of Trump and himself talking about a possible payment related to Playboy model Karen McDougal.

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He also claims to represent additional women allegedly paid by Cohen to keep quiet about what may be allegations of affairs with Trump.

"There are three additional female clients of mine that have not been disclosed that were paid hush money prior to the 2016 election, whether it be from Michael Cohen on behalf of the president, an entity that Michael Cohen formed or AMI," Avenatti said last week.

On Tuesday, a judge rejected a request from Cohen to impose a gag order on Avenatti ahead of Cohen's defamation trial.

“It is far from clear that the publicity in this case would affect the outcome of a trial that may happen, if at all, months down the road,” the judge wrote.