What better way to celebrate being arrested and watching a once-promising political career swirl down the tubes than with cake and candles? That's what Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich will do today, his 52nd birthday, which comes just one day after U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald said the two-term Democrat had gone on a "political corruption crime spree."

Blagojevich isn't the only politician to have an unfortunately-timed birthday this year. Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens (R) led on Election Night, but as the votes came in, the Senate's most senior Republican lost ground to Anchorage Mayor Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska political mess has legislators divided over meeting place Former GOP chairman Royce joins lobbying shop Lobbying world MORE (D). On November 18, Stevens's 85th birthday, the Associated Press called the race for Begich.

Other officials might want to lay low on their own birthdays. Don't be surprised if you don't see Sens. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBottom line Overnight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms Congress gives McCain the highest honor MORE (D-Mont.) and John KerryJohn Forbes KerryRomney earns rants and raves for secret Twitter name Overnight Energy: Farmers say EPA reneged on ethanol deal | EPA scrubs senators' quotes from controversial ethanol announcement | Perry unsure if he'll comply with subpoena | John Kerry criticizes lack of climate talk at debate John Kerry calls out lack of climate questions at debate MORE (D-Mass.) hanging around tomorrow, when they turn 67 and 65, respectively, or Reps. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.) and Steve Kagen (D-Wisc.), who will be 57 and 59 on Friday.

None of the four impending birthday boys are under investigation, but this year, birthdays just don't seem to be a lucky day.

-Reid Wilson