A 2008 video of Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMurkowski not worried about a Palin challenge Kavanaugh fight a GOP wake up call, but more is needed MSNBC's Nicolle Wallace: I told Jeb Bush 'he should have punched' Trump 'in the face' MORE (R-Ariz.) defending his then-campaign opponent Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaDonald Trump Jr. emerges as GOP fundraising force Trump shows peace through strength works after Obama Wake up, Kanye West MORE went viral after McCain's death on Saturday.

The resurfaced clip from the campaign trail shows McCain shutting down a supporter who pushed a racist conspiracy theory against Obama, who was then a Democratic senator from Illinois.

“I can’t trust Obama. I have read about him, and he’s not, um, he’s an Arab,” a woman said to McCain at a town hall meeting in Lakeville, Minn., in October 2008.

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McCain then grabbed the microphone and cut the woman off.

“No, ma’m,” he said. “He’s a decent family man [and] citizen that just I just happen to have disagreements with on fundamental issues, and that’s what the campaign’s all about. He’s not [an Arab].”

McCain’s response was met by boos from the crowd, according to a Politico report from the time.

The Republican giant died Saturday at the age of 81 after a battle with an aggressive form of brain cancer.

The clip began circulating again on the internet, following the news of McCain's death.

Author Stephen King said the instance was McCain’s “finest moment.”

“That’s manning up,” he said in a tweet.

Singer-songwriter Bill Madden praised McCain for standing up “in a packed auditorium full of Republican bigots” and defending Obama.

He also took a dig at President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: 'I don't trust everybody in the White House' JPMorgan CEO withdraws from Saudi conference Trump defends family separations at border MORE.

“Something Trump would’ve NEVER had the human decency to do,” Madden added.

Pakistani-Canadian author Ali Rizvi said the clip showed that McCain was “once a hero, always a hero.”

The longtime political leader and Vietnam War veteran died one day after his family announced that he would be discontinuing medical treatment for brain cancer, stating that the “progress of disease and the inexorable advance of age” had rendered “their verdict.”

McCain was diagnosed with an aggressive glioblastoma in July 2017.

He survived years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam before becoming a decades-long leading actor on the political stage.