Meghan McCain attacked "cheap rhetoric" and those who use it during her speech at her father's funeral service on Saturday in Washington while taking several swipes at President TrumpDonald John TrumpA better VA, with mental health services, is essential for America's veterans Pelosi, Nadler tangle on impeachment, contempt vote Trump arrives in Japan to kick off 4-day state visit MORE.

In her eulogy honoring Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainClimate change is a GOP issue, too It's Joe Biden's 2020 presidential nomination to lose Meghan McCain on Pelosi-Trump feud: 'Put this crap aside' and 'work together for America' MORE (R-Ariz.), the first remarks from a scheduled speaker at the service, McCain, 33, battled tears as she recounted her father's wartime sacrifice in Vietnam.

"He was a great man," McCain told the audience. "We gather here to mourn the passing of American greatness."

"The real thing, not cheap rhetoric from men who will never come near the sacrifice he gave so willingly, nor the opportunistic appropriation of those who lived lives of comfort and privilege," she added.

As the younger McCain spoke, cameras showed the late senator's wife, Cindy McCain, staring forward and applauding her daughter's remarks.

Meghan McCain went after the president elsewhere in her speech, dropping a reference to Trump's signature 2016 campaign slogan as well.
 
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"The America of John McCain has no need to be made great again because America was always great," she said to applause.
 
McCain addressed a packed audience at the Washington National Cathedral on Saturday, with various lawmakers and dignitaries on hand to honor the late senator.
 
Trump himself was not invited to attend the service, though his daughter Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpTrump family members will join state visit to UK The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump blows up meeting after Pelosi 'cover up' remarks Trump adviser expected to leave White House, join Juul MORE and her husband Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerTrump pushing for GOP donor's company to get border wall contract: report Trump family members will join state visit to UK Top Palestinian negotiator: Trump wants our surrender MORE were in attendance, along with Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisShanahan orders new restrictions on sharing of military operations with Congress: report Pentagon reporters left in dark as Iran tensions escalate Trump officials slow-walk president's order to cut off Central American aid: report MORE and White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, among others.
 
The president spent the morning tweeting about trade issues and surveillance of his 2016 presidential campaign before leaving Washington to pay a visit to his golf club in northern Virginia, according to White House pool reports.
 
Former Presidents Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaIt's Joe Biden's 2020 presidential nomination to lose Assange hit with 17 new charges, including Espionage Act violations Progressive commentator says Obama was delusional thinking he could work with Republicans MORE and George W. Bush also delivered eulogies during McCain's service on Saturday, using their speeches to address the current political climate in the U.S.
 
"He was courageous, with a courage that frightened his captors and inspired his countrymen. He was honest no matter whom it offended. Presidents were not spared," Bush said during his speech.
 
"John detested the abuse of power. He could not abide bigots and swaggering despots," he added.
 
Obama, McCain's 2008 presidential rival, also spoke of his relationship with the former longtime senator, recalling how despite their political differences they both viewed themselves as on the same "team."
 
"So much of our politics, public life, public discourse can seem small and mean and petty, trafficking in bombast, and insult, and phony controversies, and manufactured outrage," said Obama, who said that McCain called on his allies and enemies alike to be "better."
 
Meghan McCain remarked during her speech that her father was not "defined" by his membership in the Republican Party any more than he was by his service in the Navy or by his capture by North Vietnamese forces.
 
"John McCain was not defined by prison, by the Navy, by the Senate, by the Republican Party, or by any single one of the deeds in his absolutely extraordinary life," she told the audience.
 
"John McCain was defined by love," McCain added.
 
The Arizona senator, who had served in the legislative body since 1987, died last week at the age of 81, a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer.
 
Before his death, the senator battled frequently with his own party over issues such as health care and support for Trump.

Updated: 1:15 p.m.