Meghan McCain attacked "cheap rhetoric" and those who use it during her speech at her father's funeral service on Saturday in Washington while taking several swipes at President TrumpDonald John TrumpHannity urges Trump not to fire 'anybody' after Rosenstein report Ben Carson appears to tie allegation against Kavanaugh to socialist plot Five takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's fiery first debate MORE.

In her eulogy honoring Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump hits McCain on ObamaCare vote GOP, White House start playing midterm blame game Arizona race becomes Senate GOP’s ‘firewall’ MORE (R-Ariz.), the first remarks from a scheduled speaker at the service, McCain, 33, battled tears as she recounted her father's wartime sacrifice in Vietnam.

"He was a great man," McCain told the audience. "We gather here to mourn the passing of American greatness."

"The real thing, not cheap rhetoric from men who will never come near the sacrifice he gave so willingly, nor the opportunistic appropriation of those who lived lives of comfort and privilege," she added.

As the younger McCain spoke, cameras showed the late senator's wife, Cindy McCain, staring forward and applauding her daughter's remarks.

Meghan McCain went after the president elsewhere in her speech, dropping a reference to Trump's signature 2016 campaign slogan as well.
 
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"The America of John McCain has no need to be made great again because America was always great," she said to applause.
 
McCain addressed a packed audience at the Washington National Cathedral on Saturday, with various lawmakers and dignitaries on hand to honor the late senator.
 
Trump himself was not invited to attend the service, though his daughter Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpHard choices in training Americans for AI workplace of future Ex-Trump, progressive strategists battle over charges of anti-Semitism surrounding Eric Trump Ethics watchdog requests probe into Trump officials traveling to campaign events MORE and her husband Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerMueller investigating Russian payments made by Trump Tower meeting organizers: report The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil Manafort’s plea deal — the clear winners and losers MORE were in attendance, along with Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisOvernight Defense: Trump identifies first soldier remains from North Korea | New cyber strategy lets US go on offense | Army chief downplays talk of 'Fort Trump' Pompeo backed continued US support in Yemen war over objections from staff: report Stand with veterans instead of predatory for-profit colleges MORE and White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, among others.
 
The president spent the morning tweeting about trade issues and surveillance of his 2016 presidential campaign before leaving Washington to pay a visit to his golf club in northern Virginia, according to White House pool reports.
 
 
"He was courageous, with a courage that frightened his captors and inspired his countrymen. He was honest no matter whom it offended. Presidents were not spared," Bush said during his speech.
 
"John detested the abuse of power. He could not abide bigots and swaggering despots," he added.
 
Obama, McCain's 2008 presidential rival, also spoke of his relationship with the former longtime senator, recalling how despite their political differences they both viewed themselves as on the same "team."
 
"So much of our politics, public life, public discourse can seem small and mean and petty, trafficking in bombast, and insult, and phony controversies, and manufactured outrage," said Obama, who said that McCain called on his allies and enemies alike to be "better."
 
Meghan McCain remarked during her speech that her father was not "defined" by his membership in the Republican Party any more than he was by his service in the Navy or by his capture by North Vietnamese forces.
 
"John McCain was not defined by prison, by the Navy, by the Senate, by the Republican Party, or by any single one of the deeds in his absolutely extraordinary life," she told the audience.
 
"John McCain was defined by love," McCain added.
 
The Arizona senator, who had served in the legislative body since 1987, died last week at the age of 81, a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer.
 
Before his death, the senator battled frequently with his own party over issues such as health care and support for Trump.

Updated: 1:15 p.m.