13-year-old with genetic condition defends ObamaCare in Kavanaugh hearings
© Anna Moneymaker

A 13-year old with a genetic condition called Noonan syndrome testified on Friday against President TrumpDonald John TrumpSunday shows preview: Trump sells U.N. reorganizing and Kavanaugh allegations dominate Ex-Trump staffer out at CNN amid “false and defamatory accusations” Democrats opposed to Pelosi lack challenger to topple her MORE's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, saying that the U.S. must have justices on the bench that support the Affordable Care Act.  

"I am privileged to represent 130 million people with pre-existing conditions today, and I am grateful for the invitation to testify before you," Jackson Corbin told the Senate Judiciary Committee on the fourth day of hearings for Kavanaugh. 

Jackson went on to detail that he, his mother and brother have a condition known as Noonan syndrome, a genetic condition that impacts various parts of the body. 

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The disease affects his growth, strength and also causes stomach issues and headaches.  

"I speak for every American whose life could change tomorrow with a new diagnosis," Jackson said, before emphasizing the need for affordable care in the U.S. for people with pre-existing conditions. 

"If you destroy protections for pre-existing conditions, you leave me and all kids and adults like me without care and without the ability to afford our care. All because of who we are. We deserve better than that."

He continued that "we must have justices on the Supreme Court who will save the affordable care act, safeguard pre-existing conditions, and protect our care."

His testimony came during a week marked by feuds between Democratic and GOP lawmakers over Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing — a nominee who many believe could shift the court to the right for decades if confirmed.

Democratic lawmakers have pressed Trump's Supreme Court pick on a range of issues, including his opinions on ObamaCare provisions. 

Kavanaugh, however, has declined to say if he would uphold a statute that requires insurance companies to provide coverage for people with pre-existing conditions.

"All eight sitting justices on the Supreme Court have made clear it would be inconsistent with judicial independence, rooted in Article III, to provide answers on cases or issues that could come before us," Kavanaugh said on Wednesday.