Alabama pastor cuts up Nike gear during sermon
© Vimeo: Woodridge Baptist Church

The senior pastor at a Baptist church in Mobile, Ala., cut up his Nike gear during a sermon this week to protest the company’s partnership with Colin Kaepernick.

The Rev. Mack Morris on Sunday held up a Nike headband and wristband in front of the congregation at Woodridge Baptist Church and cut them with a pair of scissors, prompting a standing ovation, according to AL.com.

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"I ain't using that no more," Morris reportedly said as he cut up the headband. "I've bought my last pair of Nike shoes.”

Morris is the latest critic to publicly take aim at Nike for featuring the NFL free agent in their new ad campaign.

Kaepernick was the first NFL player to kneel during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial inequality, an that critics say disrespects the American flag and veterans. 

"He's inked a contract with Nike," Morris said of Kaepernick. "No one knows or is telling how many multi-million dollars that is going to be simply because he won't stand when the national anthem is sung."

"America may not be the best country in the world and we have a lot of faults, but I tell you what, a lot of folks died for the sake of what the flag represents,” he added.

Many conservatives, including President TrumpDonald John TrumpSunday shows preview: Trump sells U.N. reorganizing and Kavanaugh allegations dominate Ex-Trump staffer out at CNN amid “false and defamatory accusations” Democrats opposed to Pelosi lack challenger to topple her MORE, have criticized Nike over the partnership and in recent days have moved to boycott the company. Some have taken to social media to share photos of their destroyed Nike gear.

A Louisiana mayor issued a memo last week to ban the city’s recreation department from purchasing Nike products. And the College of the Ozarks, a small private college in Missouri, has said it will end the use of Nike uniforms.

Despite the backlash, Nike’s online sales have reportedly surged since announcing Kaepnerick as the face of the ad campaign.