Sarah Palin plans to leave Alaska
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Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (R) says that she and her husband are ready to leave their home in Alaska and “get outside and do more.”

“We were anchored here for the kids. Now our youngest daughter is going to be out of school — she's going to go to nursing school — she'll be taken care of,” Palin said in an interview with the Daily Mail published on Wednesday. “And we're ready to do a lot more.”

“We’re not going to be holed up in Wasilla, Alaska, the rest of our life,” the 2008 GOP vice presidential candidate continued.

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“I want to do something that will influence our culture,” she said. “To really remind people how important a work ethic is and to try to erase a lot of this idea that people have that government owes them anything. Or that anybody owes them anything.”

Palin said she still wants to be in “some positions here to get that message out there, how important it is to be independent, get out there and work for yourself.”

Palin and her husband, Todd Palin, said they have lived in Wasilla since they first met in high school. But both said they think now is time for a change.

“He's more driven then I am to bust out and get some things done,” she said.

As for where they’ll end up, her husband said: “If you see sea planes flying around Arizona or New Mexico you'll know who it is.”

The politician also offered some words of advice to her Republican colleagues.

“They're in power. They've got the House, the Senate, they have the Administration and yet they're acting like victims and they're always on defense,” she said. “That's not what the supporters of the platform expect.”

“We expect to be on offense in order to clean things up — drain that swamp — get government back on our side and get it off our backs and quit playing victim all the time!” 

“You're not going to win a ballgame only playing defense,” she added.

Palin, who was an early supporter of President TrumpDonald John TrumpCorker: US must determine responsibility in Saudi journalist's death Five takeaways from testy Heller-Rosen debate in Nevada Dem senator calls for US action after 'preposterous' Saudi explanation MORE, also said she still has a close relationship with the president although she was not invited to his presidential inauguration.

“You'll have to ask the powers that be that run that kind of machine why those who worked really hard to get him elected weren't invited,” she said.

However, the former governor said she still supports the president’s policies and is “very thankful for the Trump movement.”