Poll: More Americans believe Christine Blasey Ford than Brett Kavanaugh
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More Americans believe Christine Blasey Ford than Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh when it comes to her allegation that he sexually assaulted, according to a new Quinnipiac University National Poll.

Forty-eight percent of Americans most believe Ford's accusation that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in 1982 at a party when they were both students in high school, the survey showed. Forty-one percent of Americans said they believed Kavanaugh's denials.

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Forty-eight percent of respondents said Kavanaugh should not be confirmed to the Supreme Court; 42 percent said he should.

The poll, conducted Sept. 27-30 and released on Monday, also found that 49 percent of voters believe Kavanaugh "is the target of a politically motivated smear campaign," while 45 percent disagreed.

"Dr. Christine Blasey Ford is winning the trust of American voters, who overwhelmingly believe she is honest," Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll, said in a statement. "But about half of voters say Judge Brett Kavanaugh is the target of a smear campaign."

The poll results come just days after Ford and Kavanaugh testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee regarding Ford's allegation.

Kavanaugh has repeatedly denied the accusation. He has also denied allegations of sexual misconduct from two other women, Julie Swetnick and Deborah Ramirez.

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A Senate vote on Kavanaugh's confirmation has been delayed until Friday to allow time for the FBI to conduct its investigation. However, a vote could occur before then if the FBI concludes its investigation earlier in the week.

The New York Times on Monday reported that the White House gave authorization to the FBI to interview anyone thought to be appropriate in its investigation of Kavanaugh.

The Quinnipiac Poll was conducted among a sample population of 1,111 voters. It has a margin of error of 3.7 percentage points.