McCabe concerned about 'unfair treatment' after book release delayed by FBI

Former acting director of the FBI Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeComey’s remarks about Trump dossier are not credible, says former FBI official The Hill's Morning Report — Takeaways from the battle royal in the Oval Office Mueller’s real challenge MORE is accusing the agency of "unfair treatment"  in delaying the release of his book.

The book, "The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump," was announced in September and scheduled to be released Dec. 4 but is now being delayed until February.

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McCabe, who was fired by Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsChief Justice of California Supreme Court leaves GOP over Kavanaugh confirmation Trump attorney general pick a prolific donor to GOP candidates, groups: report Press: Mueller closes in on Trump MORE in March, said in a statement that the FBI's standard pre-publication review "has taken far longer than they led me to believe it would."

"Having been singled out for irregular, unfair treatment over the past year, I am concerned that it could be happening again," he wrote.

The FBI declined to comment on McCabe's claims.

The review process reportedly lasts 30 business days normally, but, according to FBI policy, "additional time may be necessary for sensitive, voluminous, or technical submissions."

"When a submission contains operational or intelligence matters, it is unrealistic to assume the proposed disclosure will be reviewed within 30 business days," the policy says.

McCabe was removed from the bureau just days before his scheduled retirement after the Justice Department concluded that he made unauthorized disclosures to the media and "lacked candor — including under oath — on multiple occasions."

A 20-year veteran of the FBI, McCabe has painted his ouster as an effort to interfere with special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE's Russia investigation.

“The idea that I was dishonest is just wrong,” McCabe told The New York Times at the time. “This is part of an effort to discredit me as a witness.”