A single fingerprint and several misspelled words were among some of the clues that pointed the FBI to a Florida man who was charged Friday with mailing homemade bombs to prominent Democrats, The Washington Post reported.

Cesar Sayoc Jr., a supporter of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump reversed course on flavored e-cigarette ban over fear of job losses: report Trump to award National Medal of Arts to actor Jon Voight Sondland notified Trump officials of investigation push ahead of Ukraine call: report MOREwas arrested Friday in connection with a series of 13 suspicious packages and pipe bombs that were sent to high-profile Democrats including former President Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonImpeachment hearings don't move needle with Senate GOP GOP divided over impeachment trial strategy 'Too Far Left' hashtag trends on Twitter MORE and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSondland notified Trump officials of investigation push ahead of Ukraine call: report Biden says he won't legalize marijuana because it may be a 'gateway drug' Impeachment hearings don't move needle with Senate GOP MORE, among others.

FBI Director Christopher Wray said at a press conference following Sayoc's arrest that investigators were able to find a fingerprint on the envelope of a bomb sent to Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersHouse passes Ex-Im Bank reboot bill opposed by White House, McConnell White House, McConnell come out against House bill on Ex-Im Bank Divides over China, fossil fuels threaten House deal to reboot Ex-Im Bank MORE (D-Calif.).

ADVERTISEMENT

The fingerprint marked a breakthrough for investigators, who were able to gather Sayoc’s cellphone records and track his surveillance in Florida, an official told The Post.

A number of posts supporting Trump and others critical of the media and Democrats also helped lead investigators to Sayoc.

Investigators were able to connect the more than one dozen packages because some contained the same misspellings, the Post reported. According to the criminal complaint against Sayoc, some of the packages included the same misspellings found on Sayoc's social media postings. 

Investigators pointed to the misspelling of Rep. Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzOvernight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Dem rep defends calling Ken Cuccinelli a white supremacist Both sides claim win in White House official's impeachment testimony MORE's (D), which was listed as the return address on some of the suspicious packages. The prominent Florida Democrat's name was spelled “Shultz” on the packages, according to the criminal complaint.

Suspicious packages were also sent to Wasserman Schultz, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), former Director of National Intelligence James ClapperJames Robert ClapperThe curious timeline for taking down Trump Fairness, tradition, and the Constitution demand the 'whistleblower' step forward Schiff: Barr 'weaponizing' DOJ 'to go after the president's enemies' MORE and former CIA Director John Brennan. Both packages addressed to Clapper and Brennan were addressed to them at CNN's New York offices. 

The 13 total packages contained improvised explosive devices that consisted of PVC piping, a small clock, wiring, a battery and "potential explosives,” Wray said during Friday's press conference.

Evidence technicians also found a DNA sample of two of the homemade explosive devices, which was a possible match to DNA obtained when Sayoc had previously been arrested.

Sayoc, a former pizza deliveryman and strip-club worker from Aventura, Fla., has a lengthy criminal record that includes a prior arrest in connection with threatening to use a bomb.

The 56-year-old was charged with interstate transportation of an explosive, illegal mailing of explosives, threats against former presidents and certain other persons, threatening interstate communication and assaulting federal officers. He could face up to 48 years in prison if convicted.