A single fingerprint and several misspelled words were among some of the clues that pointed the FBI to a Florida man who was charged Friday with mailing homemade bombs to prominent Democrats, The Washington Post reported.

Cesar Sayoc Jr., a supporter of President TrumpDonald John TrumpUS-Saudi Arabia policy needs a dose of 'realpolitik' Trump talks to Swedish leader about rapper A$AP Rocky, offers to vouch for his bail Matt Gaetz ahead of Mueller hearing: 'We are going to reelect the president' MOREwas arrested Friday in connection with a series of 13 suspicious packages and pipe bombs that were sent to high-profile Democrats including former President Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMatt Gaetz ahead of Mueller hearing: 'We are going to reelect the president' What to expect when Mueller testifies: Not much McConnell challenger faces tougher path after rocky launch MORE and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden compares Trump to George Wallace Sanders unveils plan to guarantee the 'right to a secure retirement' CNN Democratic debate drawing finishes third in cable news ratings race MORE, among others.

FBI Director Christopher Wray said at a press conference following Sayoc's arrest that investigators were able to find a fingerprint on the envelope of a bomb sent to Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersHillicon Valley: Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract | FTC weighs updating kids' internet privacy rules | Schumer calls for FaceApp probe | Report says states need more money to secure elections Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Maxine Waters says her committee will call in Zuckerberg to testify about Libra MORE (D-Calif.).

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The fingerprint marked a breakthrough for investigators, who were able to gather Sayoc’s cellphone records and track his surveillance in Florida, an official told The Post.

A number of posts supporting Trump and others critical of the media and Democrats also helped lead investigators to Sayoc.

Investigators were able to connect the more than one dozen packages because some contained the same misspellings, the Post reported. According to the criminal complaint against Sayoc, some of the packages included the same misspellings found on Sayoc's social media postings. 

Investigators pointed to the misspelling of Rep. Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzEpstein charges show Congress must act to protect children from abuse NYT: Don't make Acosta a political martyr Epstein charges put Trump Labor secretary back in spotlight MORE's (D), which was listed as the return address on some of the suspicious packages. The prominent Florida Democrat's name was spelled “Shultz” on the packages, according to the criminal complaint.

Suspicious packages were also sent to Wasserman Schultz, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), former Director of National Intelligence James ClapperJames Robert ClapperA brief timeline of Trump's clashes with intelligence director Dan Coats New study suggests Trump's 2016 poll numbers rose after increased Russian troll farm tweets Trump raises 2020 stakes by elevating North Korea, China on agenda MORE and former CIA Director John Brennan. Both packages addressed to Clapper and Brennan were addressed to them at CNN's New York offices. 

The 13 total packages contained improvised explosive devices that consisted of PVC piping, a small clock, wiring, a battery and "potential explosives,” Wray said during Friday's press conference.

Evidence technicians also found a DNA sample of two of the homemade explosive devices, which was a possible match to DNA obtained when Sayoc had previously been arrested.

Sayoc, a former pizza deliveryman and strip-club worker from Aventura, Fla., has a lengthy criminal record that includes a prior arrest in connection with threatening to use a bomb.

The 56-year-old was charged with interstate transportation of an explosive, illegal mailing of explosives, threats against former presidents and certain other persons, threatening interstate communication and assaulting federal officers. He could face up to 48 years in prison if convicted.