A single fingerprint and several misspelled words were among some of the clues that pointed the FBI to a Florida man who was charged Friday with mailing homemade bombs to prominent Democrats, The Washington Post reported.

Cesar Sayoc Jr., a supporter of President TrumpDonald John TrumpBill Kristol resurfaces video of Pence calling Obama executive action on immigration a 'profound mistake' ACLU says planned national emergency declaration is 'clear abuse of presidential power' O'Rourke says he'd 'absolutely' take down border wall near El Paso if he could MOREwas arrested Friday in connection with a series of 13 suspicious packages and pipe bombs that were sent to high-profile Democrats including former President Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonO’Rourke heading to Wisconsin amid 2020 speculation The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers scramble as shutdown deadline nears Exclusive: Biden almost certain to enter 2020 race MORE and former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenO’Rourke heading to Wisconsin amid 2020 speculation NBC, CNN to host first two Democratic presidential primary debates Feinstein says she thinks Biden will run after meeting with him MORE, among others.

FBI Director Christopher Wray said at a press conference following Sayoc's arrest that investigators were able to find a fingerprint on the envelope of a bomb sent to Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersOn The Money: Lawmakers closing in on border deal | Dems build case for Trump tax returns | Trump, Xi won't meet before trade deadline | Waters in talks with Mnuchin for testimony Waters in talks with Mnuchin for testimony on lifting of sanctions on Russian firms Fox's Kilmeade: Why doesn't Trump investigate personal finances of Schiff and Waters? MORE (D-Calif.).

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The fingerprint marked a breakthrough for investigators, who were able to gather Sayoc’s cellphone records and track his surveillance in Florida, an official told The Post.

A number of posts supporting Trump and others critical of the media and Democrats also helped lead investigators to Sayoc.

Investigators were able to connect the more than one dozen packages because some contained the same misspellings, the Post reported. According to the criminal complaint against Sayoc, some of the packages included the same misspellings found on Sayoc's social media postings. 

Investigators pointed to the misspelling of Rep. Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzFeminine hygiene products to be available to House lawmakers using congressional funds Dems accused of MeToo hypocrisy in Virginia President should use his address to rally Americans to our nation’s real needs MORE's (D), which was listed as the return address on some of the suspicious packages. The prominent Florida Democrat's name was spelled “Shultz” on the packages, according to the criminal complaint.

Suspicious packages were also sent to Wasserman Schultz, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), former Director of National Intelligence James ClapperJames Robert ClapperIntelligence chiefs should be commended, despite Trump's attacks on them Hillicon Valley: House Intel panel will release Russia interviews | T-Mobile, Sprint step up merger push | DHS cyber office hosting webinars on China | Nest warns customers to shore up password security House Intel panel votes to release Russia interview transcripts to Mueller MORE and former CIA Director John Brennan. Both packages addressed to Clapper and Brennan were addressed to them at CNN's New York offices. 

The 13 total packages contained improvised explosive devices that consisted of PVC piping, a small clock, wiring, a battery and "potential explosives,” Wray said during Friday's press conference.

Evidence technicians also found a DNA sample of two of the homemade explosive devices, which was a possible match to DNA obtained when Sayoc had previously been arrested.

Sayoc, a former pizza deliveryman and strip-club worker from Aventura, Fla., has a lengthy criminal record that includes a prior arrest in connection with threatening to use a bomb.

The 56-year-old was charged with interstate transportation of an explosive, illegal mailing of explosives, threats against former presidents and certain other persons, threatening interstate communication and assaulting federal officers. He could face up to 48 years in prison if convicted.