A single fingerprint and several misspelled words were among some of the clues that pointed the FBI to a Florida man who was charged Friday with mailing homemade bombs to prominent Democrats, The Washington Post reported.

Cesar Sayoc Jr., a supporter of President TrumpDonald John TrumpJulián Castro: It's time for House Democrats to 'do something' about Trump Warren: Congress is 'complicit' with Trump 'by failing to act' Sanders to join teachers, auto workers striking in Midwest MOREwas arrested Friday in connection with a series of 13 suspicious packages and pipe bombs that were sent to high-profile Democrats including former President Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMissing piece to the Ukraine puzzle: State Department's overture to Rudy Giuliani On The Money: Trump downplays urgency of China trade talks | Chinese negotiators cut US trip short in new setback | Trump sanctions Iran's national bank | Survey finds Pennsylvania, Wisconsin lost the most factory jobs in past year Meghan McCain, Ana Navarro get heated over whistleblower debate MORE and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenJulián Castro: It's time for House Democrats to 'do something' about Trump Warren: Congress is 'complicit' with Trump 'by failing to act' Sanders to join teachers, auto workers striking in Midwest MORE, among others.

FBI Director Christopher Wray said at a press conference following Sayoc's arrest that investigators were able to find a fingerprint on the envelope of a bomb sent to Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersBipartisan housing finance reform on the road less taken Manufacturing group leads coalition to urge Congress to reauthorize Ex-Im Bank Democrats' impeachment message leads to plenty of head-scratching MORE (D-Calif.).

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The fingerprint marked a breakthrough for investigators, who were able to gather Sayoc’s cellphone records and track his surveillance in Florida, an official told The Post.

A number of posts supporting Trump and others critical of the media and Democrats also helped lead investigators to Sayoc.

Investigators were able to connect the more than one dozen packages because some contained the same misspellings, the Post reported. According to the criminal complaint against Sayoc, some of the packages included the same misspellings found on Sayoc's social media postings. 

Investigators pointed to the misspelling of Rep. Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzDemocrats walk tightrope in fight over Trump wall funds Parkland father: Twitter did not suspend users who harassed me using name of daughter's killer Hillicon Valley: Senate Intel releases election security report | GOP blocks votes on election security bills | Gabbard sues Google over alleged censorship | Barr meets state AGs on tech antitrust concerns MORE's (D), which was listed as the return address on some of the suspicious packages. The prominent Florida Democrat's name was spelled “Shultz” on the packages, according to the criminal complaint.

Suspicious packages were also sent to Wasserman Schultz, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), former Director of National Intelligence James ClapperJames Robert ClapperTrump lashes out at former intel officials for criticism of Iran tweet Trump knocks news of CNN hiring ex-FBI official McCabe Conservatives lash out at CNN for hiring Andrew McCabe MORE and former CIA Director John Brennan. Both packages addressed to Clapper and Brennan were addressed to them at CNN's New York offices. 

The 13 total packages contained improvised explosive devices that consisted of PVC piping, a small clock, wiring, a battery and "potential explosives,” Wray said during Friday's press conference.

Evidence technicians also found a DNA sample of two of the homemade explosive devices, which was a possible match to DNA obtained when Sayoc had previously been arrested.

Sayoc, a former pizza deliveryman and strip-club worker from Aventura, Fla., has a lengthy criminal record that includes a prior arrest in connection with threatening to use a bomb.

The 56-year-old was charged with interstate transportation of an explosive, illegal mailing of explosives, threats against former presidents and certain other persons, threatening interstate communication and assaulting federal officers. He could face up to 48 years in prison if convicted.