Former President Obama says he doesn’t believe that Democrats would be making a mistake by selecting another woman or person of color for their presidential nominee in 2020.

“That kind of stuff, I don’t buy," Obama said during a podcast interview with David Axelrod, a CNN political commentator and his former top strategist, when asked if Democrats need a candidate of a certain gender or race to defeat President TrumpDonald John TrumpAmash responds to 'Send her back' chants at Trump rally: 'This is how history's worst episodes begin' McConnell: Trump 'on to something' with attacks on Dem congresswomen Trump blasts 'corrupt' Puerto Rico's leaders amid political crisis MORE.

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“With respect to going forward, the idea that there’s some demographic or profile of a particular candidate that is the optimal one or the ideal one, that’s just not how I’ve seen politics work,” Obama continued.

“I think people respond to candidates who speak to the moment in some fashion."

His remarks come a month after lawyer Michael Avenatti said in an interview with Time magazine that he believes the 2020 Democratic nominee "better be a white male," though he also added at the time that he wishes it weren't so.

“When you have a white male making the arguments, they carry more weight,” he said. “Should they carry more weight? Absolutely not. But do they? Yes.”

He later told The Hill his remarks were “taken out of context” and sought to clarify his comments in a follow-up tweet. Avenatti said he “consistently called on white males like me to step, take responsibility, and be a part of stopping the sexism and bigotry that other white males engage in.”

Obama’s remarks also follow comments made by Sen. Bernie SandersBernie Sanders2020 Democrats react to 'send her back' chants at Trump rally Cardi B posts message of support for Ilhan Omar #IStandWithIlhan trends after crowd at Trump rally chants 'send her back' MORE (I-Vt.) earlier this month in which he said there are “a lot of white folks out there who are not necessarily racist who felt uncomfortable for the first time in their lives about whether or not they wanted to vote for an African-American.”

“I think next time around, by the way, it will be a lot easier for them to do that,” Sanders added.

A spokesman for Sanders later sought to clarify that Sanders’s comments had also been taken out of context.

The spokesman told NPR the senator made the comments in reference to racist attacks made against Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum in Florida and former Georgia state House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams, who were the Democratic gubernatorial nominees in their respective states.