President TrumpDonald John TrumpREAD: Transcript of James Comey's interview with House Republicans Klobuchar on 2020: ‘I do think you want voices from the Midwest’ Israel boycott fight roils Democrats in year-end spending debate MORE made an error Friday when he mistakenly asserted that he was in St. Louis, Mo. during a speech to the Project Safe Neighborhoods National Conference in Kansas City, Mo.

During his speech praising local crime-fighting efforts around the country, the president praised local community organizations "right here in St. Louis," according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, despite the conference's actual venue being located in Kansas City, which shares a friendly rivalry with St. Louis.

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"James and his team have successfully ended more than 50 ongoing, escalating gunbattles between rival gangs right here in St. Louis," Trump said, praising the efforts of James Clark of the Better Family Life Initiative.

"I've been here a lot over the last couple of months," he reportedly added earlier in the speech, though it was unclear which city that remark referred to.

The White House has thrown its weight behind criminal justice reform as the year comes to a close, with Trump hoping for a criminal justice reform package drafted with input from White House adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerTrump to attend World Economic Forum in Davos for second straight year Pass the FIRST STEP Act to give second chances at the American Dream No reason to assume American relations with Mexico are rocky MORE to make it before the full Senate for a vote before the end of December.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellIsrael boycott fight roils Democrats in year-end spending debate Schumer blasts GOP request for immigration 'slush fund' Trump: 'Too early to say' if shutdown will be averted MORE (R-Ky.) has indicated that he is unlikely to bring the bill up for a vote before January, despite the legislation's support from senators in both parties.

Trump has publicly urged McConnell to move for a vote on the legislation, as Republicans fear the incoming Democratic House majority could push for stronger changes to the bill.