Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush on Tuesday called for a plaque honoring the Confederacy to be removed from Texas's state Capitol.

Bush, the eldest child of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R) and grandson of former President George H.W. Bush, wrote on Twitter that the "time has come" for Texas to remove the monument, which bears text asserting that the true cause of the Civil War was not to defend the practice of slavery.

"The time has come for the Confederate plaque to come down. These types of displays belong in museums, not our state capitol," Bush wrote.

The plaque, along with other Confederate monuments across the South, has been a point of controversy in recent years due to its message honoring veterans of the Civil War who fought for the South and its rationale for the Confederacy.

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"The war between the states was not a rebellion," the plaque, which was erected in 1959, reads in part. "Nor was it's underlying cause to sustain slavery."

Texas lawmakers have fought to have the plaque removed from the Capitol, while Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) has argued that removing the plaque is not within his authority.

"This plaque was put up at a vote by the Texas Legislature. It’s the Texas Legislature with the responsibility to take it down,” he said earlier this year according to the Texas Tribune. "Should they take it down because of the factual inaccuracy? Absolutely."

Texas Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke slams Texas official who suggested grandparents risk their lives for economy during pandemic Hispanic Caucus campaign arm unveils non-Hispanic endorsements Five Latinas who could be Biden's running mate MORE (D), whose Senate campaign garnered national attention earlier this year, also called last month for the monument to come down.

Texas authorities rejected a license plate design earlier this month from a Confederate group over concerns that the design and its Confederate imagery would conflict with existing designs.

Controversy over Confederate monuments is also making headlines currently in North Carolina, where officials at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill are working to determine the future of the school's "Silent Sam" monument.