It could take 202 years for the global gender pay gap to even out, according to to a new report from the World Economic Forum (WEF).

The annual report from WEF found that women on average make 63 percent of what men earn. There was not a single country out of 149 assessed where women on average made more or as much as men.

“The overall picture is that gender equality has stalled,” Saadia Zahidi, the WEF’s head of social and economic agendas, told The Guardian. “The future of our labour market may not be as equal as the trajectory we thought we were on.”

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The report notes that while progress is being made in several key areas when it comes to gender inequality, the economic divide is as pronounced as ever.

The impact is especially felt in leadership positions.

“In the workplace, women still encounter significant obstacles in taking on managerial or senior official roles,” the report said. “When we consider only managers for the subset of countries for which recent data are available, just about 34% of global managers are women.”

The report found that overall gender disparity, which encompasses things like politics, work, health and education in a country, has slightly improved from previous years and that the gap could be closed in 108 years.

The United States ranked 51st out of all countries for gender pay in the report.

Iceland grabbed the top spot in the report for the 10th year in a row.

The WEF hosts an annual summit in Davos, Switzerland, with the world's economic and political leaders. President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from the Democratic debate As Buttigieg rises, Biden is still the target Leading Democrats largely pull punches at debate MORE has said he will attend this year's event.