Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarTucker Carlson ratchets up criticism of Duckworth, calls her a 'coward' The Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue Progressive lawmakers call for conditions on Israel aid MORE (D-Minn.), the first Somali-American elected to Congress, on Thursday defended several tweets she sent in previous years, including one where she said she hopes people will see the "evil doings of Israel."

"I don't know how my comments would be offensive to Jewish Americans," Omar responded when asked on CNN about a Twitter post from 2012 that was sent during the eight-day conflict between Israeli forces and Palestinians in the Hamas-governed Gaza Strip.

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"My comments precisely are addressing what was happening during the Gaza war, and I am clearly speaking about the way the Israeli regime was conducting itself in that war," she added.

Omar and Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibDemocrats see victory in Trump culture war The Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue Progressive lawmakers call for conditions on Israel aid MORE (D-Mich.) are the first two Muslim women elected to serve in Congress.

The two lawmakers are vocal critics of the Israeli government and have expressed support for the "boycott, divest and sanctions" movement, commonly referred to as BDS, which encourages companies and governments to avoid doing business with the Israeli government until treatment of Palestinians in the region improves.

Omar called her election to the House last year to replace outgoing Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonMinnesota lawmakers blast pharmaceutical industry lawsuit over insulin affordability law OVERNIGHT ENERGY: DOJ whistleblower says California emissions probe was 'abuse of authority' | EPA won't defend policy blocking grantees from serving on boards | Minnesota sues Exxon, others over climate change Minnesota sues Exxon, others over climate change MORE (D-Minn.) a rejection of "religious bigotry" in the U.S.

“In a time where there is a lot of religious bigotry, it’s almost perfect to have this counterbalance. My sister Rashida and I are from the heartland of America,” Omar said at the time. “To be elected to Congress is a real rejection of that message."