Harris calls on Northam to resign
 over KKK, blackface yearbook photo
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden, Sanders to be center stage at first debate Biden, Sanders to be center stage at first debate Poll: Six Dems lead Trump in Florida match-ups MORE (D-Calif.) called on Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D) to resign on Friday after he acknowledged appearing in a picture showing a man wearing blackface and another dressed in a Ku Klux Klan robe.

Harris, a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, urged Northam to step down "so the public can heal and move forward together."

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“Leaders are called to a higher standard, and the stain of racism should have no place in the halls of government,” Harris wrote on Twitter.

Julián Castro, another Democratic presidential candidate, has also called for the first-term governor to step down.

Northam apologized Friday for appearing in the picture from his medical school yearbook. He did not clarify if he was wearing blackface or the KKK robe.

A number of Democratic lawmakers have since called on Northam to resign after the photo emerged Friday, including Reps. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellCracks form in Democratic dam against impeachment Cracks form in Democratic dam against impeachment 2020 Democrat: Trump is a national security risk MORE (Calif.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuDemocrats ask OSC to review whether Kushner violated Hatch Act Democrats ask OSC to review whether Kushner violated Hatch Act Overnight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale MORE (Calif.).

The Virginia Republican Party has already called on Northam to resign as well.

“I am deeply sorry for the decision I made to appear as I did in this photo and for the hurt that decision caused then and now,” Northam said in his statement Friday.

“This behavior is not in keeping with who I am today and the values I have fought for throughout my career in the military, in medicine, and in public service. But I want to be clear, I understand how this decision shakes Virginians’ faith in that commitment.”