Harris calls on Northam to resign
 over KKK, blackface yearbook photo
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris Booker to supporter who wanted him to punch Trump: 'Black guys like us, we don't get away with that' Tulsi Gabbard fundraises off 4/20: 'Appalls me' that feds consider marijuana illegal MORE (D-Calif.) called on Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D) to resign on Friday after he acknowledged appearing in a picture showing a man wearing blackface and another dressed in a Ku Klux Klan robe.

Harris, a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, urged Northam to step down "so the public can heal and move forward together."

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“Leaders are called to a higher standard, and the stain of racism should have no place in the halls of government,” Harris wrote on Twitter.

Julián Castro, another Democratic presidential candidate, has also called for the first-term governor to step down.

Northam apologized Friday for appearing in the picture from his medical school yearbook. He did not clarify if he was wearing blackface or the KKK robe.

A number of Democratic lawmakers have since called on Northam to resign after the photo emerged Friday, including Reps. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellCory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris 2020 Democrats commemorate 20-year anniversary of Columbine shooting Hillicon Valley: House Dems subpoena full Mueller report | DOJ pushes back at 'premature' subpoena | Dems reject offer to view report with fewer redactions | Trump camp runs Facebook ads about Mueller report | Uber gets B for self-driving cars MORE (Calif.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuDems push back on White House suggesting they're 'not smart enough' for Trump's tax returns Civil rights attorney confronts Candace Owens on Fox News Lieu fires back at GOP lawmaker who claims he was 'owned' by Candace Owens: 'She said what she said' MORE (Calif.).

The Virginia Republican Party has already called on Northam to resign as well.

“I am deeply sorry for the decision I made to appear as I did in this photo and for the hurt that decision caused then and now,” Northam said in his statement Friday.

“This behavior is not in keeping with who I am today and the values I have fought for throughout my career in the military, in medicine, and in public service. But I want to be clear, I understand how this decision shakes Virginians’ faith in that commitment.”