The White House directed the firing of former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyYates spars with GOP at testy hearing Trump knocks Sally Yates ahead of congressional testimony Hannity's first book in 10 years debuts at No. 1 on Amazon MORE in a manner that left Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinFBI officials hid copies of Russia probe documents fearing Trump interference: book Sally Yates to testify as part of GOP probe into Russia investigation Graham releases newly declassified documents on Russia probe MORE "shaken" over his role in justifying Comey's ouster, former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeFBI officials hid copies of Russia probe documents fearing Trump interference: book Senate GOP set to ramp up Obama-era probes Showtime miniseries to feature Jeff Daniels as Comey, Brendan Gleeson as Trump MORE claims in his new book.

In "The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump," McCabe reportedly writes that Rosenstein was deeply uncomfortable with Comey's firing, telling him at the time that writing the memo "wasn't his idea," according to excerpts obtained by The Guardian.

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“He said it wasn’t his idea. The president had ordered him to write the memo justifying the firing,” McCabe writes.

In his book, McCabe quotes Rosenstein as saying, "There’s no one here that I can trust," according to The Guardian.

McCabe describes Rosenstein as being "glassy-eyed" after he was allegedly ordered by the White House to draft the memo about Comey's job performance, writing that Rosenstein feared he was being used by the Trump administration as a scapegoat for Comey's firing.

Rosenstein testified publicly in May 2017 about the memo and Comey's firing, telling lawmakers at the time, “I wrote it. I believe it. I stand by it."

Excerpts from the book follow reports from The New York Times last year that Rosenstein's colleagues said he looked “shaken,” “unsteady” and “overwhelmed,” following Comey's ouster and expressed concerns that writing the memo had damaged his reputation.

A spokeswoman for the Justice Department last year dismissed claims that Rosenstein was upset with the White House, while adding that he was disturbed by Comey's decision to create memos detailing his interactions with President TrumpDonald John TrumpLincoln Project ad dubs Jared Kushner the 'Secretary of Failure' Pence: Chief Justice Roberts 'has been a disappointment to conservatives' Twitter bans Trump campaign until it deletes tweet with COVID-19 misinformation MORE.

“To be clear, he was upset not because knowledge of the existence of the memos would have changed the [deputy attorney general's] decision regarding Mr. Comey, but that Mr. McCabe chose not to tell him about their existence until only hours before someone shared them with The New York Times,” Sarah Isgur Flores said.

The White House and Trump have offered differing explanations for Comey's firing in 2017, as Trump initially claimed that Comey's handling of the special counsel investigation into possible ties between his campaign and Russia motivated his decision.