Steyer urges Pelosi to change course on impeachment
© Greg Nash

Billionaire philanthropist Tom Steyer on Wednesday urged Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) to change course on impeachment, arguing in a USA Today op-ed that it "will have catastrophic consequences for our nation" if Congress doesn't impeach Trump.

"We have never before had a president who so plainly deserves to be impeached. But beyond that, if Congress neglects its duty to do so, it will have catastrophic consequences for our nation — setting a terrible precedent, undermining our constitutional system, and leaving it vulnerable to deeper damage," Steyer wrote.

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Earlier this week, The Washington Post published an interview with Pelosi in which she came out strongly against impeaching Trump, calling impeachment a "divisive" issue.

"Impeachment is so divisive to the country that unless there’s something so compelling and overwhelming and bipartisan, I don’t think we should go down that path, because it divides the country. And he’s just not worth it," Pelosi told the Post.

But Steyer argued in the USA Today op-ed that there are enough grounds for impeachment "to cover the National Mall with indictments."

"Need to Impeach supporters have been arguing for nearly 17 months that Trump has committed multiple impeachable offenses — 10 by our latest count," he wrote.

Steyer was referencing his Need to Impeach campaign to remove Trump from office. The campaign, to which he has contributed millions of dollars, has aired television ads and funded town halls in an effort to pressure Democratic lawmakers on impeachment.

In Wednesday's USA Today op-ed, Steyer called on Pelosi and Democrats to put aside "the folly of waiting on Republicans to do the right thing."

"If Democrats know that this president has committed egregious, impeachable offenses, then they have a constitutional duty to stand up to say so. And to ensure accountability, they must begin the impeachment process regardless of how many Republican members of Congress do or don't get on board," Steyer wrote.