President TrumpDonald John TrumpClinton and Ocasio-Cortez joke about Kushner's alleged use of WhatsApp Missouri Gov. declares state of emergency amid severe flooding Swalwell on Hicks testimony: 'She's going to have to tell us who she lied for' in Trump admin MORE’s approval rating dipped by 4 percentage points to start March, according to a new poll, dropping below 40 percent. 

The Gallup poll released Thursday showed Trump with a 39 percent approval rating, down from 43 percent in the second half of February. Trump closed the month with an unsuccessful summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and saw his former personal attorney Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenSwalwell on Hicks testimony: 'She's going to have to tell us who she lied for' in Trump admin College admissions scandal underscores importance of attorney ethics in America Hillicon Valley: Kushner accused of using WhatsApp, personal email for official work | White House rejects request for Trump-Putin communications | Facebook left 'hundreds of millions' of passwords unsecured | Tech pressured to root out extremism MORE deliver explosive testimony before House lawmakers. March also opened with a less-than-stellar jobs report.

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Trump's approval rating is buoyed in large part by Republicans, 90 percent of whom gave him positive marks in the Gallup poll. Thirty-three percent of independents approve of Trump, as do just 4 percent of Democrats, according to the poll.

The poll surveyed 1,039 people from March 1 to 10 and has a margin of error of 4 percentage points.

Trump's approval rating has consistently hovered around 40 percent for much of his presidency. A RealClearPolitics average of approval rating polls shows him with a 43 percent approval rating.

The new Gallup poll was released amid a week in which Trump is set to face two rebukes from the Senate. 

Senators on Wednesday passed a joint resolution calling for an end to U.S. support of the Saudi-led military campaign in Yemen. On Thursday, the Senate is expected to pass a resolution to block the president's national emergency declaration at the southern border.

Trump has indicated he will veto both measures.

In addition, Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortCollege admissions scandal underscores importance of attorney ethics in America Five things to watch for as White House readies for Mueller report As Russia collusion fades, Ukrainian plot to help Clinton emerges MORE, was sentenced last week to just under four years in prison for his conviction on various financial crimes. His total sentence was increased to 7 1/2 years on Wednesday after an appearance in Washington, D.C., court on separate charges. Manafort on Wednesday was also charged with fraud by Manhattan prosecutors.