Chelsea Clinton was confronted by students at New York University on Friday night who claimed she “stoked” hatred that led to the New Zealand mosque shootings.

The former first daughter was attending a vigil for victims of the massacre, which left 49 people dead and dozens of others injured, when she was confronted, Fox News reported.

ADVERTISEMENT

“This right here is the result of a massacre stoked by people like you and the words that you put out into the world,” the student is seen on video saying. “And I want you to know that and I want you to feel that deep down inside. Forty-nine people died because of the rhetoric you put out there.”

Clinton, who is pregnant with her third child, said that she was sorry the students felt that way.

"Certainly, it was never my intention," Clinton said. "I do believe words matter. I believe we have to show solidarity."

“What does ‘I’m sorry you feel that way’ mean?” another person in the background can be heard asking.

The confrontation reportedly stemmed from Clinton’s condemnation of Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOcasio-Cortez says endorsing Sanders early is 'the most authentic decision' she could make Ocasio-Cortez: Sanders' heart attack was a 'gut check' moment Ocasio-Cortez tweets endorsement of Sanders MORE (D-Minn.) in recent weeks. Omar has been at the center of a debate on anti-Semitism after her comments about U.S.-Israel relations.

“We should expect all elected officials, regardless of party, and all public figures to not traffic in anti-Semitism,” Clinton wrote last month.

Clinton on Friday condemned the attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

"Heartbroken & horrified by the white nationalist terrorist attack during Jummah on the mosques and Muslim community in Christchurch," she wrote. "Keeping all affected by this tragedy in my heart and prayers. We need a global response to the global threat of violent white nationalism."

A 28-year-old Australian man has been charged with one count of murder in connection with the massacre, but he is expected to face more charges.

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern described the shooting as having been carried out by suspects with “extremist views.”

The suspect appeared to flash a white supremacist sign when he appeared in court on Saturday. 

A social media account believed to be linked to the gunman posted a lengthy manifesto expressing anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim views shortly before the attack.

The suspect also wrote that he supported President TrumpDonald John TrumpZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Trump leaning toward keeping a couple hundred troops in eastern Syria: report Warren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' MORE “as a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose” but not as a “policy maker and leader.” The White House rejected those comments on Friday.