Education Secretary Betsy DeVosElizabeth (Betsy) Dee DeVosPressley says she 'would welcome the opportunity' to educate DeVos after abortion, slavery comparison DeVos compares pro-choice to being pro-slavery Mueller investigation witness pleads guilty to child sex crime charges MORE did not directly answer a question about whether she opposed discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity after being questioned on Tuesday at a House hearing on President TrumpDonald John TrumpSchiff pleads to Senate GOP: 'Right matters. And the truth matters.' Anita Hill to Iowa crowd: 'Statute of limitations' for Biden apology is 'up' Sen. Van Hollen releases documents from GAO investigation MORE's education budget. 

Rep. Mark PocanMark William PocanSanders announces Iowa campaign swing with AOC, Michael Moore The Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clash over rules Jayapal: 'We will end up with another Donald Trump' if the US doesn't elect a progressive MORE (D-Wis.) asked Devos whether she opposed discrimination against LBGT people at Tuesday's hearing.

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"Do you think it’s all right for a school to discriminate based on someone’s sexual orientation or gender identity?” Pocan asked, pressing DeVos on her comments earlier in the hearing regarding school suspensions.

DeVos paused before responding that her civil rights office investigates "any allegation" of discrimination. 

“We have laws that cover … discriminatory efforts and our office for civil rights has continued to be very diligent in investigating any allegation of discrimination and will continue to do so,” she said. 

Pocan responded, saying that he was looking for a "yes-or-no" answer to the question. 

“So is that a yes or is that a no?” he asked. “I’m trying to get a yes-or-no, I guess, on that.”

"We follow the law as this body has defined," she said as Pocan interrupted her, asking if she "personally" had an opinion on the matter.

"Because you are giving money to some charter schools that do discriminate," Pocan said before pressing the Education secretary on her stance on charter schools.

The Hill has reached out to the Education Department for comment.

DeVos has previously been questioned by lawmakers and advocates about her policies toward LGBT individuals.

Several prominent universities urged DeVos last year to protect transgender students' rights after the Department of Health and Human Services proposed to redefine gender as strictly biological. 

Colorado Gov. Jared PolisJared Schutz PolisColorado governor pardons woman who sought sanctuary in churches to avoid deportation Democrats spend big to put Senate in play Drudge faces conservative pushback after mocking Trump's Colorado wall comment MORE (D), who was then serving as a congressman, asked DeVos at a May hearing whether she was familiar with court precedents on transgender rights. Polis in November became the first openly gay person elected to a governorship.

DeVos, at the time, said she was committed to protecting civil rights as stated by the civil rights law and the office has continued to do so.

The Human Rights Campaign, an LGBT rights advocacy group, last year projected a message on the Department of Education building asking DeVos "How do you sleep at night?" following a survey of roughly 12,000 LGBTQ teens who said Trump administration policies had targeted their demographic.

The Department of Education oversees programs and policy implementation that affect LGBT people, including regulations for how to observe Title IX gender discrimination protections.  

Pocan in 2017 led a group of LGBT Congress members sending a letter of opposition to the committee considering DeVos's nomination, citing her financial support for anti-LGBT groups and causes.