Methodist teens reject confirmations to protest church's anti-LGBT policies
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A groups of teens have refused to become members of the United Methodist Church in protest of its anti-LGBTQ policies, despite spending a year preparing for their confirmation.

According to CNN, the eight teenagers had been preparing to become members of the church as part of this year’s confirmation class for the First United Methodist Church in Omaha, Neb.

But after the United Methodist General Conference, one of the largest religious groups in the country, voted to strike down a proposal in February that would have allowed churches to marry same-sex couples and ordain LGBTQ clergy, the teenagers said they would no longer join.

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In a letter they shared on Facebook this week, the teens said that although they “spent the year learning about our faith and clarifying our beliefs,” they are disappointed with the direction the United Methodist denomination is heading “with the action of the general conference in February.”

“We are concerned that if we join at this time, we will be sending a message that we approve of this decision,” they said. “We want to be clear that, while we love our congregation, we believe that the United Methodist policies on LGBTQ+ clergy and same sex marriage are immoral.”

“Depending on how this church responds to the general conference action, we will decide at a later time whether or not to become officially confirmed,” the group continued. “But until then, we will continue to stand up against the unjust actions that the denomination is taking.” 

“We are not standing just for ourselves, we are standing for every single member of the LGBTQ+ community who is hurting right now,” they wrote. “Because we were raised in this church, we believe that if we all stand together as a whole, we can make a difference.”

The letter, first shared to Facebook on Monday, has over 5,000 reactions and shares.

Around the time of the United Methodist General Conference’s vote, thousands of churches warned they would leave the group if it voted to do away with official language banning LGBT clergy from being ordained and same-sex marriages.